Myers Barnes Blog

Differential demonstration: Is your new home presentation on the right route?

Categories: Customer Service, Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Management, New Home Sales Marketing, New Home Sales Process, New Home Sales Training | Posted: April 19, 2016

I’m still en route to differentiating new home demonstration the right way. In this article, I’m literally on the route to success.

curb appeal

Differential demonstration is a process for showing a new home in a way that drives the vision in the prospect’s mind of living in this house—from the furnishings to the activity. It’s not just a matter of walking them through the new home and exalting its wonderful features, but rather finding the “touch points” that matter to this buyer and hitting as many as possible. Help them picture themselves cooking in the kitchen, relaxing on their own furniture in the family room, waking up to the sunshine streaming through the master bedroom window, and getting ready in the morning without having to share a sink.

A new home presentation is enhanced by these differentiating points but you can also up your psychological advantage by following a pre-planned route through the home. Yes, it matters not just where you go, but when.

Is your new home sales presentation on the right route? Here’s the tour I recommend to new home sales consultants:

  1. Start at the curb. Your presentation should begin with a full view of the home’s curb appeal. Stand as far back as necessary, even stepping into the street if you have to so your prospect can get the big picture.
  2. Pause at the entry. Distinguish the home by telling the homebuyer the name of this particular home design, also noting the basic features, like number of bedrooms and baths, and the square footage. This is the introduction, appropriately offered at the threshold.
  3. Enter the foyer slowly and intentionally. Look around and remind your prospect of this place where they will be welcoming their guests.
  4. Point out the formal dining room. If there is a formal dining room off the foyer, introduce this space first.
  5. Move to the family room. The family room is probably close to the kitchen. To give your buyers the best view of the family room, move into the kitchen, far enough so they can see the full room—but you’re not going to give them the complete family room and kitchen tour…not yet, any way. Instead, you’re building up the anticipation for this important room so you can present it later in the presentation. Just let them know you’ll come back to this area.
  6. Visit the secondary bedrooms. Remember, you’re rising to a crescendo in anticipation. So, never start with the master bedroom. That’s like presenting the main course before the appetizer. Show the buyers where the other family members or guests will stay.
  7. Return to the family room and kitchen. I bet you thought I was going to guide you to the master bedroom, huh? No. Take them back to most of the living takes place. Give them the details. Talk about family activities that would happen here—family movie night, enjoying a crackling fire on a chilly night, hosting friends at the holidays. Take your time here. Paint that image so clearly that they can see, hear, smell, and taste the experience.
  8. Save the master suite for last. You’ve teased. You’ve offered subtle hints. Now take your prospects to the master suite. Ask them how they would arrange their furniture in this space. Explore the “tv or no tv in the bedroom” debate. Have them linger here so they can create the image of “home” vividly in their minds.
  9. Walk back through the family room. Redundant? Certainly not! This is the heart of the home. Bring them back here a few times to feel comfortable in this space.
  10. Exit to the patio. Guide them to the entrance to the outdoor living space. Let them take it in a moment.
  11. Move from the patio to the corner pin. Just as you started from the farthest reach in the front to enjoy the curb appeal, walk to the end of the property in the back yard. Explore the activity that could occur here. Kids playing in the yard. Cookouts. Evenings by the fire pit. Ask them to envision how they would enjoy their outdoor living in this home.
  12. Re-enter through the family room and kitchen. Again, return to the core. Ask the potential homebuyer(s) if they would like to revisit any part of the home. Invite them to browse on their own. While they wander, stay in the family room, relaxing comfortably. That means no talking or texting on the phone. Show them how it looks to have a friendly visitor.
  13. Finish. When they return, present your close in a casual, conversational manner. Your goal is to gain some type of commitment before they leave. What is the next step in this process? What do they need in order to choose this house as their home?

Practice the differential demonstration tour of your home before actually guiding any prospective homebuyers. Finetune your presentation and know your touch points so well that they are reflexive and don’t come across as scripted. Train yourself to escalate your energy level so they feel your enthusiasm for this home.

Please feel free to contact me to learn more about the essential skills involved in differential demonstration.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

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