Myers Barnes Blog

Blog Category - New Home Sales Process

Life Feel Like A Pressure Cooker?

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales Process, Personal Development | Posted: January 17, 2017

What’s a pressure cooker have to do with selling? There’s always pressure to be successful; financial pressure, family pressure, pressure from ourselves.  As we reach a new level, expect a new devil. In other words, when you climb out of your comfort zone, you will be subjected to greater challenges. The reason everyone isn’t meeting their potential for success is because not everyone is up for the challenge. If it were easy, everyone would do it! The key is to embrace the pressure, and not let it outweigh the positive aspects of the process. Just like a pressure cooker, you must keep the positive internal pressure greater than the negative (external) pressure. If you do, you’ll win in this game called life.  

Bottom line: When the pressure on the inside is greater than the pressure on the outside, you’re winning.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Business – A War Without Bullets

Categories: Customer Service, Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Process, New Home Sales Training, Personal Development | Posted: December 27, 2016

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In 1964, two men shook hands and formed Blue Ribbon Sports, a running shoe company, inspired by a Japanese company.

Five years later, on the suggestion of a friend, that company became Nike. And it revolutionized the world of sports and athletic clothing.

One of those two men was Phil Knight, who ran track at the University of Oregon, under legendary coach, Bill Bowerman, the other man in the business agreement

Nike’s pioneering approach to shoe design launched a flood of competition, as companies like Adidas, New Balance, and Puma sought to steal their share of the burgeoning market that Nike created.

Phil Knight once said, “Business is like a war without bullets.”

In business, we battle for territory—whether that’s mastery over a geographic region or a particular vertical market. We study the competition’s strategy, learning their winning ways and identifying their weaknesses. We take aim at conquering their territory. Coca-Cola and Pepsi have been at it for years, introducing new ad campaigns and new brands to take consumers away from the enemy. Both have had victories and epic failures. Yet, their battle wages on.

How are you fighting the war with and on your business? Are you strategizing ways to better define your value proposition? Are you identifying aspects about your homes, properties, construction, and service that differentiate you? Have you tried different approaches to overcome potential threats from your competitors?

You will not succeed in a stagnant position. The enemy will know where you are, who you are, and exactly what and how you sell. You’re an easy target.

The dynamic business with visionary leadership thrives. They are finding ways to invade territory that has been “owned” by other companies. They’re adding new designs to their arsenal. They’re looking at under-served markets that present sales potential. And they’re examining the way they manage their own troops—their sales force—to ensure that these front-line soldiers are armed with the knowledge, product, sales training, and ammunition to be successful.

The housing industry is rebounding from the housing bubble that burst about eight years ago. The survivors of that horrific devastation adjusted to the drastic downturn that crippled many developers. They fought through the tough times, having learned how to be agile and adapt.

Yes, the housing market is improving, but you still must be prepared to be tough and vigilant. Every sale you lose is a battle lost.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Selling Is A Contact Sport

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Process, Personal Development, Uncategorized | Posted: December 13, 2016

contact-sport-236x300We have evolved into a culture that expects instant gratification. We want Wi-Fi everywhere so we can access anything we want, at any time—and we don’t want a slow connection. How many times have you groaned while waiting for a file to download?

We have DVRs and On Demand television viewing so we can catch the shows and movies we want with the push of a button. And we want express shipping without the express price.

Email used to be a great way to quickly communicate with people…until text messaging came along. Then, email became the equivalent of snail mail, because we want an instant reply. Who wants to wait for an email response?

Let me tell you, though, you have to tame that addiction to super-speed when you’re in sales. As much as the general public wants fast response, they don’t necessarily give one in return. You’re competing with all of the other distractions in their lives. Your customers will reply when it suits them. It’s not their responsibility to respond. It’s your job to make the connection.

Far too often, I see new home sales professionals give in and give up after just a few attempts to follow up with their prospective homebuyers.

Really? These buyers are preparing to make the largest investment of their lives and they should hand it over to someone who isn’t committed enough to them to follow through?

The strength of your efforts contribute proportionally to your results. A phone message and an email is not enough to spark a relationship with a busy buyer. That’s s first date, not a relationship. A form letter without personalization is lazy, and won’t get you anywhere either.

A friend of mine is currently in the market for a new home. She visited one community, spoke with a sales associate, and learned about another community by the same builder, one that was more family-friendly in terms of amenities. This homebuyer didn’t visit that second community, but was contacted three times by another agent from that community. This person she never met thanked her for her visit and interest, and even asked her to complete a survey about the community.

She told me she even replied to the agent to advise him of the error and received yet another form letter in response.

Build a process for building connections.

The undeniable truth is that most home or homesite sales occur as a result of multiple, quality contacts. Persistence and consistency are the keys to strengthening the relationship that is essential in making the sale. The moment you stop calling or writing, you give up the sale, and another sales professional picks it up.

When you forget them, they forget you. It’s that simple.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Rethinking the Sales Process

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Management, New Home Sales Marketing, New Home Sales Process, New Home Sales Training | Posted: November 1, 2016

transferring-innovation-from-science-to-businessThe new home sales process is a science and, as with any scientific field, gut feelings and hunches do not play a role. A good business plan should be developed with a solid strategy and an understanding that selling and marketing new homes consists of four components.

Labeled the Four Ps, they were popularized by Proctor & Gamble and are utilized by industry giants such as General Electric and Microsoft. The Four P’s are effective because they break the sales and marketing process into four parts: Place, Product, Price & Promotion.

PLACE. You’ve heard the old adage: The three keys to buying real estate are location, location, location. It’s absolutely true.

The successful builder/developer understands that people don’t just live in homes. They live in a particular area, within the confines of a neighborhood in which the homes are located. Location is the factor that separates one neighborhood from another. Any builder/developer can, for the most part, construct homes at approximately the same cost per square foot, provided comparable materials are used. But the one single factor that changes the perception of value is where one home is located over another.

PRODUCT. Who is your competition? It is either other builders, or, in the case of an established neighborhood, your competition may be the resale market. You should only enter a market when your product has a perceived value that surpasses your competition.

When evaluating housing designs and floor plans, study the area’s past 12- to 24-month sales history. If a distinct market-share has been established with three-bedroom, 2.5 bath homes, then do not attempt to reinvent the wheel. Enter the marketplace with a proven design and simply add enhancements such as vaulted ceilings, spa baths, walk-in closets, or a better use of square footage. Then, you are sure to gain your fair percentage of market share.

PRICE. Again, gut feelings and hunches play no role in determining the price point for your homes. Price cannot ultimately be determined by your desire for a certain profit margin, but rather by what consumers have paid in the past.

Price is easily determined by comparable values, which can be accessed through MLS. To disregard historical pricing data and produce a product at prices that are not proven in the marketplace is writing your own invitation to disaster.

PROMOTION. Contrary to popular belief, promotion is not limited to just a good “sales process.” To reach a target audience, you must effectively plan and budget. My personal belief is that your marketing, merchandising, and products should be so good that they could almost make you, as a salesperson, obsolete.

Today’s great salespeople have developed a new mindset: They recognize that success no longer depends on communicating the value of the offering, but instead rests on the salesperson’s ability to “create value” for customers. Builders and developers who delude themselves into believing that selling is easy and strictly a function of building houses will be beat like a drum in the marketplace. It is important to grasp this truth: A sales process is a series of actions and systems directed toward the end result, which is creating a sale on purpose.

In most cases, failure in the marketplace is the result of poor planning. The Four P’s – Place, Product, Price and Promotion – are like a four-legged stool. If each is not weighted proportionately and backed with a proven sales process, the stool will wobble and become unbalanced. If the four areas are not balanced, you may see your sales topple just like a lopsided stool.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Selling Is A Dialogue, Not A Conversation.

Categories: Customer Service, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Management, New Home Sales Marketing, New Home Sales Process, New Home Sales Training | Posted: September 27, 2016

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Recently, I was talking with a great sales executive who was explaining the concept of “conversational selling”. He told me that this particular process is a more “people-friendly experience for the buyer. If we maintain control while simultaneously keeping it real with people, the comfort experienced by most of them will result in a successful sale.”

I heard what he was saying. I’ve heard it many times before.

I just don’t happen to harmonize with it.

A “conversation” isn’t purposeful. You engage in conversation with people on the street, in the grocery store, while waiting in line. It’s often a time-filler, a casual back-and-forth that can be entertaining, enlightening, or possibly thought provoking.

But what conversation lacks is purpose. You don’t venture into a conversation with a desired outcome in mind. You offer a thought, the recipient lobs one back, and you volley from there. It can drift away into unexpected tangents, and you let it—simply because that’s the interesting miscellany of conversation.

A “dialogue”, on the other hand, is a scene that is played out, in advance, in your mind. Like a director with a screenplay, your dialogue is intended to communicate a specific point, to reach a conclusion.

In the pre-Internet days, you delivered a sales presentation. It was one-sided. We served up persuasive content, carefully crafted to influence the buyer by dangling those carrots that would prompt a bite. It was, in reality, a monologue.

The Internet created a vehicle for people to browse, research, study, and even engage in conversation. Buyers today come to you with far more knowledge and insight than ever before. With the advent of social media, they’ve also become accustomed to conversation and building virtual relationships in this way.

Sales presentations have evolved, as some trainers rebranded the sales presentation and named it “sales conversation”. Selling became more about relationship building than the feature-benefit presentational approach. This connection has grown from communication that encourages trust.

I respect the idea here, yet I believe we need to commit more deeply to the goal. Instead on conversation, engage in a “sales dialogue”. Prepare yourself for the role of salesperson by knowing the outcome you desire, and then crafting the exchange to achieve it. Sure, go ahead and achieve a friendly relationship through the casual banter of conversation. I’m not advising that you skip this step. I am, however, suggesting that you use the opportunity in a more purposeful way.

Prepare the dialogue in advance. Fine-tune it so that the language delivers a message of knowledge and honesty, with healthy dose of persuasion. Study the dialogue. Create scripts that enable you to be prepared to address objections in a friendly, but guided manner.

When you watch a television show or movie, you’re hearing dialogue that has been wordsmithed, with the purpose of guiding you to a specific emotional response. The writers craft the language as interplay between two people. It’s not ad-libbed. You won’t succeed without preparation. Create a dialogue that prompts purposeful engagement between the salesperson and potential buyer. Remember that the scene should not waft along in conversation, but move along a guided path to the desired outcome—the close.

 

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

New homebuying has changed. CMAs should, too.

Categories: Customer Service, Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Process, New Home Sales Training | Posted: June 28, 2016

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Not so long ago, when you were trying to communicate the market value of a home to a prospective buyer, you prepared a competitive market analysis (CMA). The report compared the home being considered with others in a comparable neighborhood, with comparable features. You compared a 4-bedroom, 3-bath traditional home with another of the same size.

And it worked well.

The problem is, today’s homebuyer isn’t just “buying” a certain number of rooms in a desirable neighborhood. They’re looking at value, not just as purchase price, but in long-term ownership.

“Big data” is a term that describes a gathering of data that is highly focused and in-depth. The politicians have been relying on big data to better understand voters in narrow segments—like college educated, minority women under the age of 30 who live in a particular state. Big data provides a deeper understanding of behavior by particular sections.

That includes homebuyers. You can no longer sell the value of a home by comparing its structure to another “comparable” one. You have to dig deeper when creating a comp for your new homebuyer.

Lifestyle preferences are more important than the number of bathrooms or the square footage. You need to calculate other factors, like the proximity to the best schools, the view, and the age of the property, to name just a few.

Can you calculate the value of an easy commute? How much is it worth to your buyer to be able to walk the kids to school? When reviewing comps, do you take into account that one home will need to make a major renovation in the not-too-distant future, like HVAC or a new roof? Just as when you purchase a new car, you consider the cost of maintenance, you need to look at a property’s value in relation to ownership, not just purchase.

Forget the way you’ve been doing CMAs. You need to do better to sell the value of a new home to a prospective buyer. A standard CMA algorithm doesn’t take into account enough of the criteria that matters to homebuyers now. They do more research than ever before, so they come to you more informed. They won’t be satisfied with a run-of-the-mill CMA. Use a CMA platform that gives you the ability to customize the report to deliver a value that accurately reflects the home, and not just its physical attributes.

“Value” is in the eyes of the beholder. What matters to your particular buyer? First, find out. Then enter as much data as possible into your CMA program.

Then, go farther. Look at the cost of ownership. In a ten-year span, what will it cost to live in this house? How much will the utilities be for one house without energy efficient systems as compared to a new one with the latest eco-friendly advances?

Let’s also estimate the cost for replacing the roof in seven years, and the commuting cost for 20 miles, as compared to five miles.

You add it all up, and the new home you’re selling presents a total cost of ownership that is $27,000 less than the “comparable”. Can you sell that?

The housing market isn’t the “way it used to be”. Your CMAs shouldn’t either. Technology is giving you the tools to better define “value”. It’s your choice whether or not to use it. Do you want that advantage to go to your competitor?

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Differential demonstration: Sell the community along with the new home

Categories: Customer Service, Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Management, New Home Sales Marketing, New Home Sales Process, New Home Sales Training | Posted: May 17, 2016

I realize that all new home sales professionals recognize the importance of selling the community along with the new home. They know they need to sell the community in addition to the home itself, but many of them don’t know how to best succeed here.

Demonstrating a model home effectively is a skill, and one that can be learned. Differential demonstration reflects a presentation style that focuses on guiding the prospective new home buyer into the mindset of homeowner, not browser. You do this by helping them envision themselves at home, with their family, their furniture, and their pictures on the walls. They can see themselves cooking in the kitchen, enjoying a long soak in the tub, and entertaining friends in the back yard.

neighborhood

Part of being at home is the neighborhood—life beyond their yard and their driveway. What will it feel like to turn into the community as a homeowner, wave at your neighbors as you go by, walk your dog, and watch your kids play with others in the neighborhood? When you arrive at your home, where should it be with respect to the rest of your neighbors and the community? How about enjoying community amenities, like a clubhouse, pool, or walking trails?

Use differential demonstration to highlight community features that enhance the lifestyle for homeowners. As a new home sales professional, pose directed questions that will help you identify their location needs within this community.

Here are some differential demonstration questions to sell the community along with the new home you’re presenting.

Have you had an opportunity to drive through the community?

Was there something in particular that attracted you to the neighborhood? Are there any other details you would like to learn a little more about?

How important is neighborhood security to your choice for a new home?

As far as the location within this community, do you prefer the privacy of a cul-de-sac, or maybe the security an interior homesite, where neighbors surround you?

Have you considered a corner homesite? Do you know what makes a corner homesite special?

How close do you want to be to the amenities, like the pool, clubhouse, and fitness center? Do you want to be able to walk there or would you rather be a little farther away?

What direction would you like your home to face?

We do have a few green space/conservation/waterfront/pond front homesites. Of course, they are at a slight premium. Would that be of interest?

Ask questions—and lots of them. Every question should be designed to paint that picture of living in this home, on this property, and in this neighborhood. Practice your presentation questions in advance so you can ask them in a non-scripted way.

I welcome your ideas, suggestions, and experiences with respect to differential demonstration. Let me know what you’ve tried and the results. Feel free to contact me directly with any questions.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Differential demonstration: The right questions to ask your new home buyer

Categories: Customer Service, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Management, New Home Sales Marketing, New Home Sales Process, New Home Sales Training | Posted: May 3, 2016

A good interviewer knows how to guide a discussion to elicit more telling responses. You never ask a question that can be answered with just one word, because the conversation ends there.

When you are demonstrating a new home, you’re not merely showing a prospective homebuyer around, guiding them from room to room. Consider yourself a combination of a tour guide and a talk show host. Point out truly interesting aspects and engage the buyer in useful conversation.

Differential demonstration is distinguished from run-of-the-mill demonstration because it is more purposeful and, ultimately, more effective. Involve them in a discussion that guides their imagination. Encourages the buyer to experience the property, feel at home here, envision living the daily routine within this new home.

I’ve worked with superachiever sales professionals who practice differential demonstration with every presentation. Their conversion rate is consistently higher than those who just guide the buyer along a walk-through. Here are the right questions to ask your new home buyer.

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In the kitchen:

Can you imagine yourself preparing your family’s favorite meals in this kitchen?

Wouldn’t all this cabinet space and huge pantry make any chef happy?

In the living area:

Where you place your sofa in this room?

How would you situate your television and stereo in here?

In the master suite:

How would your bedroom set look in here?

Where would you place your bed and dressers?

Who would get the larger of the two closets?

In the children’s rooms:

Which of your children gets this room?

In the guest room:

How can you see yourself using this room? For guests? A home office? A craft room? Maybe an exercise room?

In the garage:

How would you use the garage space?

Would your workshop fit well here?

In the yard:

How would you landscape this yard?

Throughout the differential demonstration process, look for opportunities to spark your buyer to think about actually living in this new home. Rather than view it from the perspective of a visitor, guide them to think like the homeowner.

If you’d like to learn more about the differential demonstration approach to new home sales, please contact me.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Differential demonstration: Is your new home presentation on the right route?

Categories: Customer Service, Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Management, New Home Sales Marketing, New Home Sales Process, New Home Sales Training | Posted: April 19, 2016

I’m still en route to differentiating new home demonstration the right way. In this article, I’m literally on the route to success.

curb appeal

Differential demonstration is a process for showing a new home in a way that drives the vision in the prospect’s mind of living in this house—from the furnishings to the activity. It’s not just a matter of walking them through the new home and exalting its wonderful features, but rather finding the “touch points” that matter to this buyer and hitting as many as possible. Help them picture themselves cooking in the kitchen, relaxing on their own furniture in the family room, waking up to the sunshine streaming through the master bedroom window, and getting ready in the morning without having to share a sink.

A new home presentation is enhanced by these differentiating points but you can also up your psychological advantage by following a pre-planned route through the home. Yes, it matters not just where you go, but when.

Is your new home sales presentation on the right route? Here’s the tour I recommend to new home sales consultants:

  1. Start at the curb. Your presentation should begin with a full view of the home’s curb appeal. Stand as far back as necessary, even stepping into the street if you have to so your prospect can get the big picture.
  2. Pause at the entry. Distinguish the home by telling the homebuyer the name of this particular home design, also noting the basic features, like number of bedrooms and baths, and the square footage. This is the introduction, appropriately offered at the threshold.
  3. Enter the foyer slowly and intentionally. Look around and remind your prospect of this place where they will be welcoming their guests.
  4. Point out the formal dining room. If there is a formal dining room off the foyer, introduce this space first.
  5. Move to the family room. The family room is probably close to the kitchen. To give your buyers the best view of the family room, move into the kitchen, far enough so they can see the full room—but you’re not going to give them the complete family room and kitchen tour…not yet, any way. Instead, you’re building up the anticipation for this important room so you can present it later in the presentation. Just let them know you’ll come back to this area.
  6. Visit the secondary bedrooms. Remember, you’re rising to a crescendo in anticipation. So, never start with the master bedroom. That’s like presenting the main course before the appetizer. Show the buyers where the other family members or guests will stay.
  7. Return to the family room and kitchen. I bet you thought I was going to guide you to the master bedroom, huh? No. Take them back to most of the living takes place. Give them the details. Talk about family activities that would happen here—family movie night, enjoying a crackling fire on a chilly night, hosting friends at the holidays. Take your time here. Paint that image so clearly that they can see, hear, smell, and taste the experience.
  8. Save the master suite for last. You’ve teased. You’ve offered subtle hints. Now take your prospects to the master suite. Ask them how they would arrange their furniture in this space. Explore the “tv or no tv in the bedroom” debate. Have them linger here so they can create the image of “home” vividly in their minds.
  9. Walk back through the family room. Redundant? Certainly not! This is the heart of the home. Bring them back here a few times to feel comfortable in this space.
  10. Exit to the patio. Guide them to the entrance to the outdoor living space. Let them take it in a moment.
  11. Move from the patio to the corner pin. Just as you started from the farthest reach in the front to enjoy the curb appeal, walk to the end of the property in the back yard. Explore the activity that could occur here. Kids playing in the yard. Cookouts. Evenings by the fire pit. Ask them to envision how they would enjoy their outdoor living in this home.
  12. Re-enter through the family room and kitchen. Again, return to the core. Ask the potential homebuyer(s) if they would like to revisit any part of the home. Invite them to browse on their own. While they wander, stay in the family room, relaxing comfortably. That means no talking or texting on the phone. Show them how it looks to have a friendly visitor.
  13. Finish. When they return, present your close in a casual, conversational manner. Your goal is to gain some type of commitment before they leave. What is the next step in this process? What do they need in order to choose this house as their home?

Practice the differential demonstration tour of your home before actually guiding any prospective homebuyers. Finetune your presentation and know your touch points so well that they are reflexive and don’t come across as scripted. Train yourself to escalate your energy level so they feel your enthusiasm for this home.

Please feel free to contact me to learn more about the essential skills involved in differential demonstration.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

The key to new home demonstration: WIIFM?

Categories: Customer Service, Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Management, New Home Sales Marketing, New Home Sales Process, New Home Sales Training | Posted: April 5, 2016

In my last post, I talked about “differential demonstration” and the “Ta-Daaa Girl”. She’s the one on the game shows who waves her arm to show all the lovely prizes a contest might win. Yes, that’s a real job.

I want to explore differential demonstration a bit more, because I think there are many new home salespeople who still don’t understand how to effectively present a model to a potential buyer. The key to new home demonstration boils down to answering the buyer’s unspoken question:

“What’s in it for me?”—or “WIIFM?” as the marketing industry likes to call this approach to establishing value proposition.

whats-in-it-for-me

You can guide the buyer through the home and point out lovely features, but if you don’t connect the value to the prospect, you don’t gain any points. You haven’t effectively communicated to this person why they should care about that feature. You need to establish that connection and make it personal. Paint the picture of this individual, couple, or family living here in this home. They should picture themselves, with their furnishings, eating meals, relaxing in the living room, playing in the yard, working in the garage. Make no assumptions that they are having these visions. For all you know, they are overlooking a valuable feature, or are simply distracted.

Try this as you walk through the family room:

“This is where you and your family will spend most of your time. You can see, we move away from a traditional plan and have combined the family room and the kitchen in a manner that is both convenient and inclusive, meaning everyone in the family can enjoy one another’s company.”

When you give your buyers a tour of the kitchen, ask them to picture themselves preparing meals in this space. Don’t you love this kitchen? This open design allows everyone in the family to spend time with one another. How’s the kitchen design feel to you?”

In the master bath, communicate the value of the double vanity. “The design of double vanity is perfect for the on-the-go couple trying to blend two busy and sometimes similar schedules—getting ready for work or play at the same time. Also notice the enclosed, private toilet. It allows two people to access to the bathroom to dress, groom, or wash at the same time, while still affording privacy and space.

From room to room, plant the seed that converts their minds from browsing to living. Pull them into this home, rather than just showing it, like the Ta-Daaa Girl.

Before you demonstrate a home, differentiate it. Walk-through and create scenarios for buyers. Be prepared to adapt your presentation to the needs and wishes your prospects have communicated or might appreciate. Show them a room that would be ideal for a home office or media center, even if it isn’t presently decorated for that purpose. It’s your job to create the image of this model being a home to your buyer.

If you can’t answer their “WIIFM?” question, you haven’t done your job.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.