Myers Barnes Blog

Blog Category - New Home Sales

Learning Optimism: Your Glass Is Always Full

Categories: New Home Sales, Personal Development, Uncategorized | Posted: May 16, 2017

Some people are perpetual pessimists. Others fall into the category of hopefuls.

There are also people who are somewhere in the middle.

“I understand the concept of optimism,” said Tom Hanks, the actor who has portrayed characters like the wide-eyed optimist, Forrest Gump, and the scientific cynic of Dan Brown’s novels. “I think with me, what you get is a lack of cynicism.”

My take on optimism is more like author and artist Mary Engelbreit: “If you don’t like something, change it. If you can’t change it, change the way you think about it.”

I’ve had occasions in my life when my knee-jerk reaction was to see the pessimistic side of a situation, but I learned optimism.

Yes, you can learn it—if you want to.

Why would you want to gain hope that hopeless situations will turn around? Why would you choose to wear the rose-colored glasses when they color your view?

Positive thought breeds positive outcomes, and the reverse is true. Which would you rather cultivate?

Henry Ford said, “If you think you can do a thing or think you can’t do a thing, you’re right.”

Belief is powerful. Believe you can achieve success, and you’ve overcome a major hurdle. However, when you believe it’s too far beyond your reach, you create those obstacles. I’d rather invest my time in seeing past the hurdles, believing that I can soar over them. When I can’t, I accept it’s only a momentary delay—a challenge to become more agile or stronger, or to learn some other valuable lesson.

Maybe you’re mired in a pessimistic mindset right now. This is the perfect time for learning optimism.

Here are some lessons for you:

  1. For every obstacle, find a positive purpose. Thomas Edison needed 10,000 tries to invent the light bulb. He considered each one as a lesson in what didn’t When you find yourself in a difficult, frustrating, or potentially back-pedaling situation, find a positive message. No matter how hard it is, the lesson is there if you choose to look for it.
  2. Be grateful. Don’t focus on what you’re lacking in your life. Be thankful for the rewards. It could be family, health, friendships, or having a secure job or even a roof over your head. There are millions of people in the world who have it tougher than you. Acknowledge your personal “wealth”.
  3. Don’t compete. Your happiness or sadness should not be dictated by the actions or possessions of others. Don’t measure yourself by other people’s successes. That leads to envy and resentment, which are toxic emotions. Be happy for their achievements, and channel your energy into your self-esteem and self-worth.
  4. Applaud small successes. The big win happens once in awhile. Don’t wait to celebrate your major achievements. Think about what you did today that was positive. Maybe you had a conversation with the cashier at your grocery store and made that person smile. Perhaps you completed something on your “To Do” list that has been nagging you for a long time. Whatever it is, find something every day to feel good about.
  5. I had a friend who worked in radio and she told me that the trick to pumping energy into her voice was to smile when she spoke. A smile is a powerful thing. Smile at a stranger—even if they don’t smile back, you’ll feel good.

Believe in the power of optimism. Call yourself an optimist. Fill your glass halfway and look at it. Remember, you can only see the liquid, but air fills the rest of the glass. The things you can’t see will often be the fillers in your life. Look for them. And raise your glass to the possibility of positivity.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Accountability: Things Don’t Get Better Unless You Do

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Training, Personal Development | Posted: May 11, 2017

So, what’s an excuse? Excuses are reasons you create in your own mind to avoid the reality that you failed to hit the mark in some way. An excuse is just some justification that you believe gets you off the hook for whatever action you chose, including inaction. We need to cease with all these excuses and instead accept accountability.

It was George Washington Carver who said, “If not for the creativity of an excuse, man would actually succeed.” This is where accountability kicks in. Stop making excuses and accept responsibility. We all need to be more accountable for our choices and our actions. We shouldn’t waste energy seeking excuses, but rather learn from our failures and apply those lessons.

Ask questions like, “What have I failed to explore?” “What different approach is worth pursuing?” “What should I have done differently?” If you want better results, you need to change your tactics. Circumstances may not get better, but your approach, your attitude, and your actions can.

The Pain Of Discipline Vs. The Pain Of Regret

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Training, Personal Development | Posted: May 2, 2017

Regret is one of those useless emotions. It’s mourning something you failed to do or get. You can’t change the outcome. It’s a done deal. So, why waste your energy on the burden and pain of regret?

Discipline delivers pain, but with purpose. You push yourself to do those things that you’d rather avoid. You get up early and go for a run when you’d rather stay in bed. You say “no” to that second helping of pasta or a slice of three-layer chocolate cake because you know you’ll regret it later. So, to avoid that wasted emotion of regret, you fight off the temptation that could take you there.

Over a century ago, Albert Hubbard defined discipline as, “the ability to make yourself do the things you should do, when you should do them, whether you feel like it or not.”

That’s the inherent pain in discipline. You fight against your own urges. Your brain wages an intellectual battle between what you “want” and what you “should do”.

Discipline drives you to keep working on a report because, in your heart, you know you can do better. Accepting something as “good enough” is a compromise you’re not willing to make.

In sales, discipline is the reason you pursue your leads with more consistency and confidence. You don’t give up after a few tries.

Self-discipline guides you to push harder toward achieving a desirable outcome. At the other side of discipline is accomplishment, while regret only brings self-doubt.

When it comes to making tough choices, you will reside in one of two pain zones: the pain of discipline or the pain of regret. Discipline is like labor pain. It lasts for a short while but then gives you a lasting joy.

Regret is a burden. Nothing more.

Put them on a scale. Discipline can be measured in ounces. Regret weighs a ton.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Selling New Homes Isn’t Easy

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Training | Posted: April 28, 2017

Selling new homes successfully is not easy! If you’re a new homes sales professional, you already know this. In this business there is no set schedule, you don’t get to work nine-to-five and then clock out. This is a twenty-four hours a day, 7 days a week serving profession. Occasionally you might take a vacation, but you work super hard to even make that happen. Business is always on your mind! And inevitably, you are going to experience rejection. Deals that seem like slam dunks, sometimes they fall through!

So, why do you do all this? Why would someone put themselves through this?

New home selling is actually a lifestyle. It’s a mindset. You actually enjoy helping people achieve the dream of finding their new home. You relish that moment when you hand the homebuyers their keys knowing they get to start their new life. And while money isn’t everything, you also get to reap the rewards of being in the top 3% of the income bracket in this country.

Bottomline, selling new homes is not easy, but nothing worthwhile ever is.

 

Next Steps

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach | Posted: April 25, 2017

In 1966 Robert F. Kennedy delivered a speech that included a Chinese proverb which says “May he live in interesting times.”

Like it or not, we live in interesting times. They are times of danger and uncertainty, but they are also the most creative of any time in the history of mankind.

Transitioning

In many ways, the quote above resonates with me as I begin the transition out of my Myers Barnes sales training & consulting and into my role as president of Builder Designs. For the past 20 plus years, I have had the privilege and honor of working with some of the best and brightest home builders in the US and Canada. During that time we’ve made significant progress not only in the sales training arena but in general business model progression and enhancement. I truly feel blessed to have been part of that.

Looking Forward

I start my new role as President of Builder Design in June, and as I wind down MBA I have been asked the question: “are you still going to be doing sales training and consulting?”. The answer is yes, but in a limited, private capacity. Starting in June my sales training and business consulting will be limited to just Builder Designs clients. Builder Designs will offer complimentary seminars, webinars, and consultations for just their clients, and they’ll all be centered around the web – digital marketing – sales and sales management training for a web savvy homebuyer.

More to Come

I’ll be bringing my passion and experience to the Builder Designs team and to Builder Designs clients, and together we’ll be offering an integrated solution that’s unlike anything in the industry.

There’s so much coming that I want to share, but you’ll have to stay tuned for all of the new things we’ll be bringing to the table.

#disruptor

 

Sales Profiling: A Lead Is A Person, Not A Thing

Categories: Customer Service, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Management, New Home Sales Training | Posted: April 18, 2017

Sales professionals often refer to “leads” like a form letter. They read the characteristics and make assumptions.

These same people talk about working their leads via social media or the CRM system.

I wonder, how does these people who are being treated as a “lead” feel about the sales person? Do they categorize him or her as just “someone trying to sell me”? Do they recognize those form emails?

These characterizations create barriers that impact the sales process. You see the other person as a caricature or stereotype, based on brief information gained through an online inquiry or Facebook post. I guess we could call it “sales profiling”.

We’re in a new age of personal selling that was ironically spawned from impersonal impact of the Internet. People shop on the Web. They do their research there. They even look for reviews and recommendations.

But when it comes down to making an important purchase, like buying a new home, the sales process requires a personal relationship. A buyer needs to trust that a sales professional is truly committed to finding the right home—in the right location and at the right price. That trust doesn’t come from an introductory email or a few Facebook messages swapped online. It can start there, but you need to cultivate those relationships.

A “lead” is an inquiry that stems from interest. You need to gauge the level of interest by getting to know the person. A lead could go nowhere, or it could bring you to not just one sale, but more referrals.

Emails, online inquiries, and social media stir up leads. It’s your job to take the one-dimensional thing and create a relationship. Pick up the phone and call. Ask questions. Answer questions. Offer suggestions. Successful selling is a partnership between you and your customer. It only starts with a lead. Where will you take it?

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Motivate Your Sales Team With Optimism

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, Personal Development | Posted: April 4, 2017

A sales career is difficult. You have to work through rejections that far outnumber your successes. At times, it can be tough to keep pushing.

That’s where effective sales leadership comes in.

I recently wrote an article about “learning optimism”. A good sales leader possesses the valuable quality of positive thinking, and passes it along to the team.

Retrain and refresh.

I’ve seen dejected sales professionals who have heard a few too many times about a competitor’s homes, and has maybe lost sales to the other builder. They start to question themselves and the product.

This is when the sales leader steps in. Take the associate away from the sales task for a bit. Engage in re-training. Talk about the new homes that the buyers seem drawn to. Discuss the objections to the homes you’re selling. Remind the sales person of the positive aspects of these homes. If a customer feels the price is too high, then the sales associate hasn’t sold them on the value.

Maybe you need to sell the sales person first!

Demonstrate the real-world value.

Connect your road-weary sales professional with two or more satisfied homebuyers. Suggest they visit the homes and let the owners gush over the features they love, and how easy the building process progressed. Ask them what mattered to them, what influenced their decision, and why this builder is so exceptional. It’s a good refresher for your sales team to rediscover the true value of the buying experience and the product they’re selling.

Share success stories.

Ask your team members to talk about how they turned adversity around. They should explain the challenge and how they faced it down. It can sometimes be disheartening to hear about others’ success when you’re down, so be sure to highlight the challenge and how the sales associate overcame it. They need to relate to the struggle, not simply envy the outcome.

Put the responsibility where it belongs.

Sit down with your sales associate and explore the individual obstacles. What is good about the job? What is difficult? What would you like to do better?

Set daily, weekly, and monthly goals—not necessarily in terms of sales, but in process improvement. For example, rewrite your script for the initial conversation today. Tomorrow, make a list of common objections and script your responses. Identify a weekly goal for follow-ups.

A leader motivates others to achieve their potential, but, ultimately, it’s up to the individual to put thoughts into action.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Extra! Extra! Big News from Olathe, Kansas

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Marketing, New Home Sales Training | Posted: March 23, 2017

Myers Barnes joins Builder Designs as President.

Homebuilder website development firm expands its digital marketing services.

Chip & Myers at Builder Designs

OLATHE, KS—Homebuilders across North America have a powerful, marketing resource, the result of the newly announced partnership with two recognized experts. Nationally renowned new home sales strategist Myers Barnes has joined Builder Designs, a website development company that exclusively serves the homebuilding industry. Barnes has been named the president of Builder Designs, teaming up with the company’s founder and CEO, Chip Johnson.

As a speaker, educator, and best-selling author, Barnes has guided countless builders toward greater profits. His books include Reach the Top In New Home and Neighborhood Sales, which quickly became the certified handbook for sales professionals, and New Home Sales Negotiation, which is considered an industry playbook for success. His company, Myers Barnes Associates, has offered innovative thinking, strategic direction, and a wealth of growth-focused resources to homebuilders for over two decades.

Barnes and Johnson have collaborated countless times, and they realized that a stronger partnership would provide homebuilders with the support they need to successfully navigate the challenges of Internet marketing.

“I’ve always admired the level of success that Myers has sparked in clients—many of whom we’ve shared,” explains Johnson, who has developed websites for more than 450 homebuilders across North America. “We’ve seen that our knowledge, skills, and passion complement one another. Combining forces was a logical next step to better serve our clients.”

Barnes adds, “We live in a digital world. It’s less about techniques for closing the sale, and more about the online involvement. Homebuyers are doing far more research than ever before. Their needs have changed, the path to purchase has transformed, and so conventional strategies just don’t work anymore.”

Builder Designs is preparing to launch a series of new products that will continue to revolutionize Internet marketing. Builder Cloud and Builder IQ, for example, will open new gateways for gathering and analyzing data that is critical to connecting with and influencing homebuyers.

Barnes refers to the expansion of Builder Designs’ offerings as a “think tank for homebuilders and an all-inclusive online resource center.”

“We can work with a variety of builders, start-up or a seasoned pro, and apply our broad portfolio of services to build or refine strategy, execute the activities, and analyze the results,” says Barnes. “We’re looking at a bigger horizon, where we can do more than help builders to generate leads. We will use digital approaches to actually transform those leads into sales long before they walk into a builder’s model home.

Johnson has invested in deepening Builder Designs’ technical expertise. He has explored new possibilities for lead generation and conversion using a broader range of tools, including FindABuilder.

“Our clients won’t have to wonder if their Internet marketing works because we’ll be able to present the analytics to back it up,” Johnson adds.

For more information about Builder Designs, visit BuilderDesigns.com

About Builder Designs

Builder Designs was founded in 2004 by Chip Johnson, to address the specific online marketing needs of America’s homebuilders. Based in Olathe, Kansas, Builder Designs has become the world’s largest builder-centric, web design company, currently serving more than 400 builders. The combination of web design, search engine optimization (SEO) services, content management, and digital marketing strategy have propelled Builder Designs to become a formidable resource for the industry.

The Mindset of an Entrepreneur

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Training | Posted: February 14, 2017

 

The word entrepreneur has become a reflection of the American dream.  From a high schooler’s lawn care business to Bill Gates’ empire, we tend to hear the word more and more these days.

In the world of new home sales, an entrepreneur is the savvy individual who sees possibility. Rather than take a prospect’s word at face value, they realize the potential for a sale the minute that person walks through the door.
Life is filled with opportunity, so your mission of commission is to embrace the mindset and lifestyle of an entrepreneur. Learn what it really means to turn nothing into something in new home sales.
Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Selling Is A Dialogue, Not A Conversation

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Management, New Home Sales Management Training, New Home Sales Training | Posted: January 31, 2017

The concept of conversational selling may be a friendly approach to the sales process, but it’s not the most effective. Why? A conversation lacks a purpose. Alone, it is nothing more than a time filler or casual banter back and forth. And although this can still be part of your sales process, what you really need is a dialogue. Consider a dialogue like the screen play of a movie or show. It’s meant to guide you to a specific emotional response, having been constructed in a purposeful way. Like in most things, you won’t succeed without preparation. Don’t just engage in conversation, but create a dialogue that has a guided path with a desired outcome: the conclusion of the sale. Learn more about how crafting a dialogue will help your sales soar.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.