Myers Barnes Blog

Blog Category - Personal Development

“No” is the start of a discussion, not the end.

Categories: Customer Service, Leadership, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Training, Personal Development | Posted: June 13, 2017

When someone tells you, “No”, do you take that answer as final?

Your computer doesn’t accept it. Think of all those times you click on a button and get the query, “Are you sure?” in response.

Your kids don’t accept it. They’ll push and whine in order to convert your “No” to a “Yes”, a “Maybe”, or even a “We’ll see”.

As sales professionals, we should feel energized by the word, “No”. It should jump-start our sales skills to deal with the reason behind the negative response. Does it mean “not ever”, “not now”, or “not under those terms”? You owe it to yourself AND your customer to probe more deeply. There could be a miscommunication about the offer, the details, the timing, the product—whatever. The buyer might be experiencing a déjà vu from a previous experience that has made her hesitant to say, “Yes”. She might also not be ready for your close at this moment.

You should pursue the discussion to clarify the meaning of the “No”.

Is there something more you’d like to know about this property, builder, or community?

What is holding you back from making the decision? What’s missing from this?

What would make the timing right for you?

I don’t want to be overly pushy. I want to make sure you’re not missing out because I haven’t communicated effectively.

This last statement is a great way to build the rapport. By taking responsibility for the “No”, the buyer is not on the offensive. They might even feel they owe you an explanation!

Use the “No” to learn more about your homebuyer—needs, timing, budget, concerns, likes and dislikes. Remember, the word “no” is part of “know”. If you don’t want to hear “no” more, then KNOW more!

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Toxic employees: Why YOU might be the real problem

Categories: Leadership, Personal Development | Posted: May 30, 2017

No matter how carefully you screen candidates, some of them will turn into bad employees. They show up late, leave early, complain about anything and everything. These people fail to meet their goals, and always have an excuse for coming up short and the promise to do better.

You might overlook the problem for awhile. Maybe you take the person aside and extend a pep talk or mildly suggest an attitude adjustment.

When the behavior persists, however, the problem is not the difficult employee, but YOU. By ignoring the situation, you allow the unhealthy environment to continue. Your productive and valued team members undoubtedly recognize the flaws in the toxic employee. While they are first annoyed by the errant co-worker, the frustration will turn to you, as the “leader” who is allowing this individual to continue to disrupt the workflow and environment.

What does this say about you?

You’re an enabler. Your tolerance of the behavior allows it to continue. The weak link is not going to change unless you demand it. By not doing so, you’re indicating that the performance is acceptable, and, therefore, enabling it to continue.

Your standards are inconsistent. If you expect some people to meet (or exceed) their goals, while others can get by with less, the standards you think you’ve set have no credibility.

You accept mediocrity. This toxic environment will indeed fester when you let it. Otherwise good team members will see that mistakes are ok. Putting forth a partial effort is fine, because they see it happening, without any repercussions.

You don’t value your good employees. Undoubtedly, someone on your team is working harder to make up for that bad employee. Someone is correcting the mistakes and finishing the details. You’re allowing that to continue, which indicates you don’t mind others doing more than their share.

I’ve always believed that you do not fire people; they “de-hire” themselves. Those individuals who choose not to perform their jobs have made a decision. You simply need to take action in response.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Learning Optimism: Your Glass Is Always Full

Categories: New Home Sales, Personal Development, Uncategorized | Posted: May 16, 2017

Some people are perpetual pessimists. Others fall into the category of hopefuls.

There are also people who are somewhere in the middle.

“I understand the concept of optimism,” said Tom Hanks, the actor who has portrayed characters like the wide-eyed optimist, Forrest Gump, and the scientific cynic of Dan Brown’s novels. “I think with me, what you get is a lack of cynicism.”

My take on optimism is more like author and artist Mary Engelbreit: “If you don’t like something, change it. If you can’t change it, change the way you think about it.”

I’ve had occasions in my life when my knee-jerk reaction was to see the pessimistic side of a situation, but I learned optimism.

Yes, you can learn it—if you want to.

Why would you want to gain hope that hopeless situations will turn around? Why would you choose to wear the rose-colored glasses when they color your view?

Positive thought breeds positive outcomes, and the reverse is true. Which would you rather cultivate?

Henry Ford said, “If you think you can do a thing or think you can’t do a thing, you’re right.”

Belief is powerful. Believe you can achieve success, and you’ve overcome a major hurdle. However, when you believe it’s too far beyond your reach, you create those obstacles. I’d rather invest my time in seeing past the hurdles, believing that I can soar over them. When I can’t, I accept it’s only a momentary delay—a challenge to become more agile or stronger, or to learn some other valuable lesson.

Maybe you’re mired in a pessimistic mindset right now. This is the perfect time for learning optimism.

Here are some lessons for you:

  1. For every obstacle, find a positive purpose. Thomas Edison needed 10,000 tries to invent the light bulb. He considered each one as a lesson in what didn’t When you find yourself in a difficult, frustrating, or potentially back-pedaling situation, find a positive message. No matter how hard it is, the lesson is there if you choose to look for it.
  2. Be grateful. Don’t focus on what you’re lacking in your life. Be thankful for the rewards. It could be family, health, friendships, or having a secure job or even a roof over your head. There are millions of people in the world who have it tougher than you. Acknowledge your personal “wealth”.
  3. Don’t compete. Your happiness or sadness should not be dictated by the actions or possessions of others. Don’t measure yourself by other people’s successes. That leads to envy and resentment, which are toxic emotions. Be happy for their achievements, and channel your energy into your self-esteem and self-worth.
  4. Applaud small successes. The big win happens once in awhile. Don’t wait to celebrate your major achievements. Think about what you did today that was positive. Maybe you had a conversation with the cashier at your grocery store and made that person smile. Perhaps you completed something on your “To Do” list that has been nagging you for a long time. Whatever it is, find something every day to feel good about.
  5. I had a friend who worked in radio and she told me that the trick to pumping energy into her voice was to smile when she spoke. A smile is a powerful thing. Smile at a stranger—even if they don’t smile back, you’ll feel good.

Believe in the power of optimism. Call yourself an optimist. Fill your glass halfway and look at it. Remember, you can only see the liquid, but air fills the rest of the glass. The things you can’t see will often be the fillers in your life. Look for them. And raise your glass to the possibility of positivity.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Accountability: Things Don’t Get Better Unless You Do

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Training, Personal Development | Posted: May 11, 2017

So, what’s an excuse? Excuses are reasons you create in your own mind to avoid the reality that you failed to hit the mark in some way. An excuse is just some justification that you believe gets you off the hook for whatever action you chose, including inaction. We need to cease with all these excuses and instead accept accountability.

It was George Washington Carver who said, “If not for the creativity of an excuse, man would actually succeed.” This is where accountability kicks in. Stop making excuses and accept responsibility. We all need to be more accountable for our choices and our actions. We shouldn’t waste energy seeking excuses, but rather learn from our failures and apply those lessons.

Ask questions like, “What have I failed to explore?” “What different approach is worth pursuing?” “What should I have done differently?” If you want better results, you need to change your tactics. Circumstances may not get better, but your approach, your attitude, and your actions can.

The Pain Of Discipline Vs. The Pain Of Regret

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Training, Personal Development | Posted: May 2, 2017

Regret is one of those useless emotions. It’s mourning something you failed to do or get. You can’t change the outcome. It’s a done deal. So, why waste your energy on the burden and pain of regret?

Discipline delivers pain, but with purpose. You push yourself to do those things that you’d rather avoid. You get up early and go for a run when you’d rather stay in bed. You say “no” to that second helping of pasta or a slice of three-layer chocolate cake because you know you’ll regret it later. So, to avoid that wasted emotion of regret, you fight off the temptation that could take you there.

Over a century ago, Albert Hubbard defined discipline as, “the ability to make yourself do the things you should do, when you should do them, whether you feel like it or not.”

That’s the inherent pain in discipline. You fight against your own urges. Your brain wages an intellectual battle between what you “want” and what you “should do”.

Discipline drives you to keep working on a report because, in your heart, you know you can do better. Accepting something as “good enough” is a compromise you’re not willing to make.

In sales, discipline is the reason you pursue your leads with more consistency and confidence. You don’t give up after a few tries.

Self-discipline guides you to push harder toward achieving a desirable outcome. At the other side of discipline is accomplishment, while regret only brings self-doubt.

When it comes to making tough choices, you will reside in one of two pain zones: the pain of discipline or the pain of regret. Discipline is like labor pain. It lasts for a short while but then gives you a lasting joy.

Regret is a burden. Nothing more.

Put them on a scale. Discipline can be measured in ounces. Regret weighs a ton.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Motivate Your Sales Team With Optimism

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, Personal Development | Posted: April 4, 2017

A sales career is difficult. You have to work through rejections that far outnumber your successes. At times, it can be tough to keep pushing.

That’s where effective sales leadership comes in.

I recently wrote an article about “learning optimism”. A good sales leader possesses the valuable quality of positive thinking, and passes it along to the team.

Retrain and refresh.

I’ve seen dejected sales professionals who have heard a few too many times about a competitor’s homes, and has maybe lost sales to the other builder. They start to question themselves and the product.

This is when the sales leader steps in. Take the associate away from the sales task for a bit. Engage in re-training. Talk about the new homes that the buyers seem drawn to. Discuss the objections to the homes you’re selling. Remind the sales person of the positive aspects of these homes. If a customer feels the price is too high, then the sales associate hasn’t sold them on the value.

Maybe you need to sell the sales person first!

Demonstrate the real-world value.

Connect your road-weary sales professional with two or more satisfied homebuyers. Suggest they visit the homes and let the owners gush over the features they love, and how easy the building process progressed. Ask them what mattered to them, what influenced their decision, and why this builder is so exceptional. It’s a good refresher for your sales team to rediscover the true value of the buying experience and the product they’re selling.

Share success stories.

Ask your team members to talk about how they turned adversity around. They should explain the challenge and how they faced it down. It can sometimes be disheartening to hear about others’ success when you’re down, so be sure to highlight the challenge and how the sales associate overcame it. They need to relate to the struggle, not simply envy the outcome.

Put the responsibility where it belongs.

Sit down with your sales associate and explore the individual obstacles. What is good about the job? What is difficult? What would you like to do better?

Set daily, weekly, and monthly goals—not necessarily in terms of sales, but in process improvement. For example, rewrite your script for the initial conversation today. Tomorrow, make a list of common objections and script your responses. Identify a weekly goal for follow-ups.

A leader motivates others to achieve their potential, but, ultimately, it’s up to the individual to put thoughts into action.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

True Happiness Is Progress

Categories: Personal Development | Posted: February 28, 2017

An Chinese philosopher once said, “The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.” So where do you begin on the journey to true happiness?

Some people equate happiness to having more stuff and acquiring more things. But in reality, genuine happiness is progress, or the joy that comes with forward movement. And although it may be easy to confuse change with progress, not all change will make us happy. Why? Because change is automatic where progress takes dedicated effort. If you seek true happiness, it can only be achieved when you’re working toward a specific goal. So start right now, and learn more about realizing your goal for happiness.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

What leadership lesson did we learn from Super Bowl LI?

Categories: Leadership, Personal Development | Posted: February 10, 2017

As a Tom Brady fan, I was heartbroken as I watched the New England Patriots fall farther and farther behind in the first half of Super Bowl LI. It seemed like an insurmountable challenge. They were trailing the Atlanta Falcons 28-3 in the third quarter, and no team had ever come back from more than a 10-point deficit, let alone 25!

I’ve learned never to rely on odds. As a cancer survivor, I am living proof that statistics represent what has happened in the past, and not what can be achieved.

As the third quarter was winding down, Tom Brady made his move. Play by play, the closed the gap and scored the 25 points they needed to tie the game, while keeping Atlanta from increasing their own.

History was made by the comeback and the first Super Bowl to go into overtime. In a stunning turnaround, the Patriots scored a touchdown in overtime and took their fifth Super Bowl title.

It was the best Super Bowl ever played, pitting the league’s two most powerful teams against one another. It was also the most exciting example of fighting for a goal—figuratively and literally—I’ve seen.

Every player on the team contributed to this win. Offense and defense did their jobs. If any one of 16 plays weren’t correctly executed, the Patriots would have lost. But they rallied as a team, ignoring the heavy weight of the odds, and persevered.

“You’ve got to believe,” said Pats’ wide receiver Julian Edelman, who made the game’s most incredible catch late in the fourth quarter. He also said that the team stayed focused on the game, not the score.

You will always face obstacles on the road to success. It’s how you deal with the pressure, the odds, and the hurdles that ultimately defines you. When you allow your team to to give in and give up, you will never achieve your potential. You will never experience the extreme satisfaction that comes from overcoming.

When everyone counts you out, count yourself all the way in.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Life Feel Like A Pressure Cooker?

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales Process, Personal Development | Posted: January 17, 2017

What’s a pressure cooker have to do with selling? There’s always pressure to be successful; financial pressure, family pressure, pressure from ourselves.  As we reach a new level, expect a new devil. In other words, when you climb out of your comfort zone, you will be subjected to greater challenges. The reason everyone isn’t meeting their potential for success is because not everyone is up for the challenge. If it were easy, everyone would do it! The key is to embrace the pressure, and not let it outweigh the positive aspects of the process. Just like a pressure cooker, you must keep the positive internal pressure greater than the negative (external) pressure. If you do, you’ll win in this game called life.  

Bottom line: When the pressure on the inside is greater than the pressure on the outside, you’re winning.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Pessimism vs. Optimism

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Training Video, Personal Development | Posted: January 3, 2017

Myers Barnes illustrates pessimism versus optimism with a glass half full, half empty analogy. With the half full mindset, you see all things as possible and there’s no failure; with the half empty mindset, you find opposition and have a “I’m not being negative, I’m just being realistic.” outlook.  If you believe in negative outcomes, they become true and even worse, a self-fulfilling prophecy.  In this video, America’s favorite new home sales trainer explains that the glass can’t be both half full and half empty, it has to be one or the other.  The truth is the glass is always half FULL, it’s just a matter of what it’s full with – air or matter – aka: mind over matter.  Making positive change in life starts with a positive outlook, and all you have to do is believe you can achieve.

Bottom line: Optimism makes you rich, pessimism makes you poor, not just in your wallet, but in your life!

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.