How Personality Types -Yours and Others-Affect Negotiations

We all assume that other people want what we want and therefore attempt to conduct the negotiation in the same way we would. We all react and respond according to our own dominant personality style. Consequently, you should know yourself better than others do, and know others better than they know themselves. This week, let’s talk about the first personality type, the DIRECTOR:

Directors are no nonsense, bottom-line people. Give them the ball and let them run. They like challenges and they want immediate results. They love power, authority, and prestige.

STRENGTHS OF THE DIRECTOR TYPE:
Born leader
Unemotional
Embraces and is in dire need of change
Goal oriented
Well organized
Big thinker
Thrives on competition
Excels in emergencies and usually has the right answer for a problem

WEAKNESSES OF THE DIRECTOR TYPE:
Bossy, impatient, tactless
Comes on too strong
Minimum tolerance for poor performance, mistakes, and ambiguity
Enjoys controversy
Can’t relax
Quick tempered
Big picture, but details unimportant
May be right, but disliked in the process

OBSERVABLE BEHAVIORS OF THE DIRECTOR TYPE:
First impression: Direct and self-assured
Movement: Quick and fast-paced
Main focus: The task at hand
Priority: Results in the shortest amount of time
Irritations: Wasting time, chitchat, and actions that postpone results
For acceptance: Depends on leadership skills
Personal worth: Measured by winning track record, results
Personal billboard: "Notice my accomplishments"

A DIRECTOR TYPE MAY WANT:
Authority
Challenges
Prestige
Freedom
Varied Activities
Difficult Assignments
Logical Approach
Opportunity for Advancement

HOW TO RESPOND TO THE DIRECTOR TYPE:
Provide direct answers, be brief and to the point.
Confrontation may be necessary to gain their attention.
Ask "what" questions, not "how."
Stick to business.
Outline possibilities for Director to get results, solve problems, be in charge.
Stress logic of ideas or approaches.
When in agreement, agree with facts and ideas, not the person.
If time lines or sanctions exist, get them into the open but relate them to end results or goal.

CHECK BACK FOR PART 2 OF THE FOUR PERSONALITY TYPES…

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