The Myth of the Natural-born Salesperson — New Home Sales Training

I keep hearing successful closers described as "a natural-born salesperson.” When a baby is born, do you think the doctor hands the infant to the parents and says, "Congratulations, you have a bouncing baby salesperson?”

We are born with certain physical traits and then develop behaviors and knowledge. The skills that distinguish a successful salesperson are not genetic. It’s not a gift to be a closer, as any successful closer will tell you. A salesperson must learn the skills of the trade, just as any other professional. A lawyer, doctor, or accountant spends years studying their trades to become the best they can be — which is why they call their businesses "practice.” Their skills are not intuitive, but based on years of practice.

The "natural-born salesperson" is simply an individual who excels at this profession to such a degree that he or she makes it look easy. But underneath the smooth exterior is a good listener, a person who hears the buyer’s spoken and unspoken needs. This successful person understands buying behavior and has finely tuned negotiating skills. This ability to sell is developed by making the effort to stop and listen — a talent that far too few people possess. The knowledge is honed through an unending educational process of reading and attending seminars, and by being ever watchful for signs and opportunities.

I am always amazed at the small minority of salespeople who do not study the art of negotiation. They spend their entire careers negotiating six-figure (and greater) deals but have never invested the time in learning how to negotiate effectively. You do your homework to learn to bake a pie or fix your leaky faucet, yet when it comes to your livelihood, the most important "how to" of negotiating is ignored.

Make it your goal to read a book or attend a seminar or webinar on negotiating skills in the next three months. Never stop growing. Your success depends on it.

Myers

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