Easy Street Is A Detour Off The Road To Success

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Scott Peck’s classic book, “The Road Less Traveled”, starts with three words:

“Life is difficult.”

Peck first published the bestseller in 1978—before the Internet, smartphones, and all the gadgetry that has been created, presumably, to make our lives less difficult. Has it? Or has technology given us the idea that we can get whatever we want, as fast as we want?

The road to achievement is less traveled, because it is marked with bumps and potholes—obstacles that can sometimes be difficult to navigate. Life not an easy trip. It’s not promised to be. Without challenge, we don’t grow. We don’t learn how to improvise and innovate. We merely move along, accepting the status quo.

Those who want a smooth ride can aim for the easy way out, but what will they miss along the way?

When I hit a bump in the road, I take it as a learning experience. Why did I end up here? Did I take a wrong turn or make a bad decision? Was I basing my choice on incorrect or incomplete information, while ignoring my instincts? What can I take away from this part of my journey?

As much as we would love to take the express route to success, there are no shortcuts. In fact, taking Easy Street is a detour off the road to success.

In his 2008 book, “Outliers: The Story of Success”, Malcom Gladwell presented his “10,000-Hour Rule”. He posited that achieving true mastery—not mere proficiency—of any skill requires 10,000 hours of practice. Becoming an expert doesn’t happen by reading a couple of books or attending a webinar. You have to put that knowledge to work, test it, refine it, and shape it into your own success. That type of achievement doesn’t occur quickly. It can’t.

When you choose speed over commitment, you compromise the outcome. You might even settle for “good enough”, which equates to “average”. Does average make you remarkable? Does average define successful people?

Imagine where we would be if everyone took the easy way out. Mediocrity might replace the exceptional. We would settle for what we have. People might attempt to strive for something more, but they would give up short of reaching the goal.

Easy Street is a dead-end road for anyone who desires true success. Don’t delay your journey with shortcuts.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

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