Myers Barnes Blog

Blog Category - New Home Sales Coach

“No” is the start of a discussion, not the end.

Categories: Customer Service, Leadership, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Training, Personal Development | Posted: June 13, 2017

When someone tells you, “No”, do you take that answer as final?

Your computer doesn’t accept it. Think of all those times you click on a button and get the query, “Are you sure?” in response.

Your kids don’t accept it. They’ll push and whine in order to convert your “No” to a “Yes”, a “Maybe”, or even a “We’ll see”.

As sales professionals, we should feel energized by the word, “No”. It should jump-start our sales skills to deal with the reason behind the negative response. Does it mean “not ever”, “not now”, or “not under those terms”? You owe it to yourself AND your customer to probe more deeply. There could be a miscommunication about the offer, the details, the timing, the product—whatever. The buyer might be experiencing a déjà vu from a previous experience that has made her hesitant to say, “Yes”. She might also not be ready for your close at this moment.

You should pursue the discussion to clarify the meaning of the “No”.

Is there something more you’d like to know about this property, builder, or community?

What is holding you back from making the decision? What’s missing from this?

What would make the timing right for you?

I don’t want to be overly pushy. I want to make sure you’re not missing out because I haven’t communicated effectively.

This last statement is a great way to build the rapport. By taking responsibility for the “No”, the buyer is not on the offensive. They might even feel they owe you an explanation!

Use the “No” to learn more about your homebuyer—needs, timing, budget, concerns, likes and dislikes. Remember, the word “no” is part of “know”. If you don’t want to hear “no” more, then KNOW more!

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

The Pain Of Discipline Vs. The Pain Of Regret

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Training, Personal Development | Posted: May 2, 2017

Regret is one of those useless emotions. It’s mourning something you failed to do or get. You can’t change the outcome. It’s a done deal. So, why waste your energy on the burden and pain of regret?

Discipline delivers pain, but with purpose. You push yourself to do those things that you’d rather avoid. You get up early and go for a run when you’d rather stay in bed. You say “no” to that second helping of pasta or a slice of three-layer chocolate cake because you know you’ll regret it later. So, to avoid that wasted emotion of regret, you fight off the temptation that could take you there.

Over a century ago, Albert Hubbard defined discipline as, “the ability to make yourself do the things you should do, when you should do them, whether you feel like it or not.”

That’s the inherent pain in discipline. You fight against your own urges. Your brain wages an intellectual battle between what you “want” and what you “should do”.

Discipline drives you to keep working on a report because, in your heart, you know you can do better. Accepting something as “good enough” is a compromise you’re not willing to make.

In sales, discipline is the reason you pursue your leads with more consistency and confidence. You don’t give up after a few tries.

Self-discipline guides you to push harder toward achieving a desirable outcome. At the other side of discipline is accomplishment, while regret only brings self-doubt.

When it comes to making tough choices, you will reside in one of two pain zones: the pain of discipline or the pain of regret. Discipline is like labor pain. It lasts for a short while but then gives you a lasting joy.

Regret is a burden. Nothing more.

Put them on a scale. Discipline can be measured in ounces. Regret weighs a ton.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Next Steps

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach | Posted: April 25, 2017

In 1966 Robert F. Kennedy delivered a speech that included a Chinese proverb which says “May he live in interesting times.”

Like it or not, we live in interesting times. They are times of danger and uncertainty, but they are also the most creative of any time in the history of mankind.

Transitioning

In many ways, the quote above resonates with me as I begin the transition out of my Myers Barnes sales training & consulting and into my role as president of Builder Designs. For the past 20 plus years, I have had the privilege and honor of working with some of the best and brightest home builders in the US and Canada. During that time we’ve made significant progress not only in the sales training arena but in general business model progression and enhancement. I truly feel blessed to have been part of that.

Looking Forward

I start my new role as President of Builder Design in June, and as I wind down MBA I have been asked the question: “are you still going to be doing sales training and consulting?”. The answer is yes, but in a limited, private capacity. Starting in June my sales training and business consulting will be limited to just Builder Designs clients. Builder Designs will offer complimentary seminars, webinars, and consultations for just their clients, and they’ll all be centered around the web – digital marketing – sales and sales management training for a web savvy homebuyer.

More to Come

I’ll be bringing my passion and experience to the Builder Designs team and to Builder Designs clients, and together we’ll be offering an integrated solution that’s unlike anything in the industry.

There’s so much coming that I want to share, but you’ll have to stay tuned for all of the new things we’ll be bringing to the table.

#disruptor

 

Sales Profiling: A Lead Is A Person, Not A Thing

Categories: Customer Service, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Management, New Home Sales Training | Posted: April 18, 2017

Sales professionals often refer to “leads” like a form letter. They read the characteristics and make assumptions.

These same people talk about working their leads via social media or the CRM system.

I wonder, how does these people who are being treated as a “lead” feel about the sales person? Do they categorize him or her as just “someone trying to sell me”? Do they recognize those form emails?

These characterizations create barriers that impact the sales process. You see the other person as a caricature or stereotype, based on brief information gained through an online inquiry or Facebook post. I guess we could call it “sales profiling”.

We’re in a new age of personal selling that was ironically spawned from impersonal impact of the Internet. People shop on the Web. They do their research there. They even look for reviews and recommendations.

But when it comes down to making an important purchase, like buying a new home, the sales process requires a personal relationship. A buyer needs to trust that a sales professional is truly committed to finding the right home—in the right location and at the right price. That trust doesn’t come from an introductory email or a few Facebook messages swapped online. It can start there, but you need to cultivate those relationships.

A “lead” is an inquiry that stems from interest. You need to gauge the level of interest by getting to know the person. A lead could go nowhere, or it could bring you to not just one sale, but more referrals.

Emails, online inquiries, and social media stir up leads. It’s your job to take the one-dimensional thing and create a relationship. Pick up the phone and call. Ask questions. Answer questions. Offer suggestions. Successful selling is a partnership between you and your customer. It only starts with a lead. Where will you take it?

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Motivate Your Sales Team With Optimism

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, Personal Development | Posted: April 4, 2017

A sales career is difficult. You have to work through rejections that far outnumber your successes. At times, it can be tough to keep pushing.

That’s where effective sales leadership comes in.

I recently wrote an article about “learning optimism”. A good sales leader possesses the valuable quality of positive thinking, and passes it along to the team.

Retrain and refresh.

I’ve seen dejected sales professionals who have heard a few too many times about a competitor’s homes, and has maybe lost sales to the other builder. They start to question themselves and the product.

This is when the sales leader steps in. Take the associate away from the sales task for a bit. Engage in re-training. Talk about the new homes that the buyers seem drawn to. Discuss the objections to the homes you’re selling. Remind the sales person of the positive aspects of these homes. If a customer feels the price is too high, then the sales associate hasn’t sold them on the value.

Maybe you need to sell the sales person first!

Demonstrate the real-world value.

Connect your road-weary sales professional with two or more satisfied homebuyers. Suggest they visit the homes and let the owners gush over the features they love, and how easy the building process progressed. Ask them what mattered to them, what influenced their decision, and why this builder is so exceptional. It’s a good refresher for your sales team to rediscover the true value of the buying experience and the product they’re selling.

Share success stories.

Ask your team members to talk about how they turned adversity around. They should explain the challenge and how they faced it down. It can sometimes be disheartening to hear about others’ success when you’re down, so be sure to highlight the challenge and how the sales associate overcame it. They need to relate to the struggle, not simply envy the outcome.

Put the responsibility where it belongs.

Sit down with your sales associate and explore the individual obstacles. What is good about the job? What is difficult? What would you like to do better?

Set daily, weekly, and monthly goals—not necessarily in terms of sales, but in process improvement. For example, rewrite your script for the initial conversation today. Tomorrow, make a list of common objections and script your responses. Identify a weekly goal for follow-ups.

A leader motivates others to achieve their potential, but, ultimately, it’s up to the individual to put thoughts into action.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Ice Cubes To Eskimos

Categories: New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Management, New Home Sales Management Training, New Home Sales Training, New Home Sales Training Video | Posted: March 15, 2017

Have you ever received a backdoor compliment? When I was once told I could “sell ice cubes to eskimos,” the context may have been genuine, but the meaning wasn’t accurate.
As a real estate professional, you’re helping people make one of the single most significant decisions of their lives.  You’re not only selling a product, you’re helping people select the environment that will shape their lives and the lives of their families.
In the eskimos ‘case, selling someone something they don’t actually need would mean you’re in it only for the sake of the deal and not the good of the customer. Learn how simply keeping the goal of service in the forefront of your sales will make all the difference.
Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

The Mindset of an Entrepreneur

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Training | Posted: February 14, 2017

 

The word entrepreneur has become a reflection of the American dream.  From a high schooler’s lawn care business to Bill Gates’ empire, we tend to hear the word more and more these days.

In the world of new home sales, an entrepreneur is the savvy individual who sees possibility. Rather than take a prospect’s word at face value, they realize the potential for a sale the minute that person walks through the door.
Life is filled with opportunity, so your mission of commission is to embrace the mindset and lifestyle of an entrepreneur. Learn what it really means to turn nothing into something in new home sales.
Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Business – A War Without Bullets

Categories: Customer Service, Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Process, New Home Sales Training, Personal Development | Posted: December 27, 2016

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In 1964, two men shook hands and formed Blue Ribbon Sports, a running shoe company, inspired by a Japanese company.

Five years later, on the suggestion of a friend, that company became Nike. And it revolutionized the world of sports and athletic clothing.

One of those two men was Phil Knight, who ran track at the University of Oregon, under legendary coach, Bill Bowerman, the other man in the business agreement

Nike’s pioneering approach to shoe design launched a flood of competition, as companies like Adidas, New Balance, and Puma sought to steal their share of the burgeoning market that Nike created.

Phil Knight once said, “Business is like a war without bullets.”

In business, we battle for territory—whether that’s mastery over a geographic region or a particular vertical market. We study the competition’s strategy, learning their winning ways and identifying their weaknesses. We take aim at conquering their territory. Coca-Cola and Pepsi have been at it for years, introducing new ad campaigns and new brands to take consumers away from the enemy. Both have had victories and epic failures. Yet, their battle wages on.

How are you fighting the war with and on your business? Are you strategizing ways to better define your value proposition? Are you identifying aspects about your homes, properties, construction, and service that differentiate you? Have you tried different approaches to overcome potential threats from your competitors?

You will not succeed in a stagnant position. The enemy will know where you are, who you are, and exactly what and how you sell. You’re an easy target.

The dynamic business with visionary leadership thrives. They are finding ways to invade territory that has been “owned” by other companies. They’re adding new designs to their arsenal. They’re looking at under-served markets that present sales potential. And they’re examining the way they manage their own troops—their sales force—to ensure that these front-line soldiers are armed with the knowledge, product, sales training, and ammunition to be successful.

The housing industry is rebounding from the housing bubble that burst about eight years ago. The survivors of that horrific devastation adjusted to the drastic downturn that crippled many developers. They fought through the tough times, having learned how to be agile and adapt.

Yes, the housing market is improving, but you still must be prepared to be tough and vigilant. Every sale you lose is a battle lost.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Selling Is A Contact Sport

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Process, Personal Development, Uncategorized | Posted: December 13, 2016

contact-sport-236x300We have evolved into a culture that expects instant gratification. We want Wi-Fi everywhere so we can access anything we want, at any time—and we don’t want a slow connection. How many times have you groaned while waiting for a file to download?

We have DVRs and On Demand television viewing so we can catch the shows and movies we want with the push of a button. And we want express shipping without the express price.

Email used to be a great way to quickly communicate with people…until text messaging came along. Then, email became the equivalent of snail mail, because we want an instant reply. Who wants to wait for an email response?

Let me tell you, though, you have to tame that addiction to super-speed when you’re in sales. As much as the general public wants fast response, they don’t necessarily give one in return. You’re competing with all of the other distractions in their lives. Your customers will reply when it suits them. It’s not their responsibility to respond. It’s your job to make the connection.

Far too often, I see new home sales professionals give in and give up after just a few attempts to follow up with their prospective homebuyers.

Really? These buyers are preparing to make the largest investment of their lives and they should hand it over to someone who isn’t committed enough to them to follow through?

The strength of your efforts contribute proportionally to your results. A phone message and an email is not enough to spark a relationship with a busy buyer. That’s s first date, not a relationship. A form letter without personalization is lazy, and won’t get you anywhere either.

A friend of mine is currently in the market for a new home. She visited one community, spoke with a sales associate, and learned about another community by the same builder, one that was more family-friendly in terms of amenities. This homebuyer didn’t visit that second community, but was contacted three times by another agent from that community. This person she never met thanked her for her visit and interest, and even asked her to complete a survey about the community.

She told me she even replied to the agent to advise him of the error and received yet another form letter in response.

Build a process for building connections.

The undeniable truth is that most home or homesite sales occur as a result of multiple, quality contacts. Persistence and consistency are the keys to strengthening the relationship that is essential in making the sale. The moment you stop calling or writing, you give up the sale, and another sales professional picks it up.

When you forget them, they forget you. It’s that simple.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Easy Street Is A Detour Off The Road To Success

Categories: New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Management, New Home Sales Management Training, Personal Development | Posted: November 29, 2016

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Scott Peck’s classic book, “The Road Less Traveled”, starts with three words:

“Life is difficult.”

Peck first published the bestseller in 1978—before the Internet, smartphones, and all the gadgetry that has been created, presumably, to make our lives less difficult. Has it? Or has technology given us the idea that we can get whatever we want, as fast as we want?

The road to achievement is less traveled, because it is marked with bumps and potholes—obstacles that can sometimes be difficult to navigate. Life not an easy trip. It’s not promised to be. Without challenge, we don’t grow. We don’t learn how to improvise and innovate. We merely move along, accepting the status quo.

Those who want a smooth ride can aim for the easy way out, but what will they miss along the way?

When I hit a bump in the road, I take it as a learning experience. Why did I end up here? Did I take a wrong turn or make a bad decision? Was I basing my choice on incorrect or incomplete information, while ignoring my instincts? What can I take away from this part of my journey?

As much as we would love to take the express route to success, there are no shortcuts. In fact, taking Easy Street is a detour off the road to success.

In his 2008 book, “Outliers: The Story of Success”, Malcom Gladwell presented his “10,000-Hour Rule”. He posited that achieving true mastery—not mere proficiency—of any skill requires 10,000 hours of practice. Becoming an expert doesn’t happen by reading a couple of books or attending a webinar. You have to put that knowledge to work, test it, refine it, and shape it into your own success. That type of achievement doesn’t occur quickly. It can’t.

When you choose speed over commitment, you compromise the outcome. You might even settle for “good enough”, which equates to “average”. Does average make you remarkable? Does average define successful people?

Imagine where we would be if everyone took the easy way out. Mediocrity might replace the exceptional. We would settle for what we have. People might attempt to strive for something more, but they would give up short of reaching the goal.

Easy Street is a dead-end road for anyone who desires true success. Don’t delay your journey with shortcuts.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.