Myers Barnes Blog

Accountability: Things Don’t Get Better Unless You Do

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Training, Personal Development | Posted: May 11, 2017

So, what’s an excuse? Excuses are reasons you create in your own mind to avoid the reality that you failed to hit the mark in some way. An excuse is just some justification that you believe gets you off the hook for whatever action you chose, including inaction. We need to cease with all these excuses and instead accept accountability.

It was George Washington Carver who said, “If not for the creativity of an excuse, man would actually succeed.” This is where accountability kicks in. Stop making excuses and accept responsibility. We all need to be more accountable for our choices and our actions. We shouldn’t waste energy seeking excuses, but rather learn from our failures and apply those lessons.

Ask questions like, “What have I failed to explore?” “What different approach is worth pursuing?” “What should I have done differently?” If you want better results, you need to change your tactics. Circumstances may not get better, but your approach, your attitude, and your actions can.

Do you deliver frictionless buying?

Categories: Customer Service | Posted: May 8, 2017

Friction isn’t just that chafing feeling when someone is rubbing you the wrong way. In the language of selling, friction is a barrier. It’s a reason for someone to think twice, and perhaps go elsewhere. The less friction you create between you and your buyer, the more seamless the experience for both of you.

Look at Amazon, the master of frictionless buying. When you want something—anything—you search the online retailer’s site. You check the reviews, make your choice, and it’s one-click easy to buy what you want, delivered where it needs to be, in two days (or less) for no shipping.

Can it get any more frictionless than that?

Sure. I can order whenever I want because Amazon never closes. If I open a gift on Christmas morning and it’s not what I want, need, or will ever wear, I can go to Amazon’s site and exchange it, right then. They’ll even have someone pick it up from my door. They are always open and they deliver on Sundays.

Frictionless Businesses

Amazon is one of the world’s largest retailers, and it achieved that status without a brick-and-mortar store.

Uber is the largest transportation business worldwide and the company made it to the top without owning a single vehicle.

Airbnb is the global leader in vacation travel, without owning any rooms!

Each of these businesses disrupted their industry and dethroned competitors through frictionless selling and service. They make it as easy as possible for the customer to get what they want. You do whatever it takes to make the purchasing decision a seamless no-brainer. Minimize the steps. Remove the obstructions for a frictionless buying process.

How does this relate to new home sales?

How’s your website?

Today, 78% of your weekend web traffic comes in over a mobile phone! So, is your website Mobile First, super-fast and easily navigable?

Important questions to think about when it comes to your website…

  • How many times do you meet with a customer before they choose to buy from you?
  • How many phone calls and emails are exchanged? Does your customer have to wait for a response? How long is the wait?
  • How many design variations and finance options do you present?

Every unnecessary step along the path to purchase is an opportunity for your customer to take a detour elsewhere.

If Amazon’s store was only open certain hours, would you continue to shop there?

If Uber didn’t conduct their business over your mobile phone, or the driver was not 5 Star rated, and they conducted their business the same as a cab, or if they arrived late, would you use the service again?

There are ways to reduce the friction in your sales process. We’ll come back later to give you more information or feel free to get in touch to get started right away: contact Builder Designs


The post appeared first on BuilderIQ: Monday Thoughts with Myers: Do You Deliver Frictionless Buying?

The Pain Of Discipline Vs. The Pain Of Regret

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Training, Personal Development | Posted: May 2, 2017

Regret is one of those useless emotions. It’s mourning something you failed to do or get. You can’t change the outcome. It’s a done deal. So, why waste your energy on the burden and pain of regret?

Discipline delivers pain, but with purpose. You push yourself to do those things that you’d rather avoid. You get up early and go for a run when you’d rather stay in bed. You say “no” to that second helping of pasta or a slice of three-layer chocolate cake because you know you’ll regret it later. So, to avoid that wasted emotion of regret, you fight off the temptation that could take you there.

Over a century ago, Albert Hubbard defined discipline as, “the ability to make yourself do the things you should do, when you should do them, whether you feel like it or not.”

That’s the inherent pain in discipline. You fight against your own urges. Your brain wages an intellectual battle between what you “want” and what you “should do”.

Discipline drives you to keep working on a report because, in your heart, you know you can do better. Accepting something as “good enough” is a compromise you’re not willing to make.

In sales, discipline is the reason you pursue your leads with more consistency and confidence. You don’t give up after a few tries.

Self-discipline guides you to push harder toward achieving a desirable outcome. At the other side of discipline is accomplishment, while regret only brings self-doubt.

When it comes to making tough choices, you will reside in one of two pain zones: the pain of discipline or the pain of regret. Discipline is like labor pain. It lasts for a short while but then gives you a lasting joy.

Regret is a burden. Nothing more.

Put them on a scale. Discipline can be measured in ounces. Regret weighs a ton.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Selling New Homes Isn’t Easy

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Training | Posted: April 28, 2017

Selling new homes successfully is not easy! If you’re a new homes sales professional, you already know this. In this business there is no set schedule, you don’t get to work nine-to-five and then clock out. This is a twenty-four hours a day, 7 days a week serving profession. Occasionally you might take a vacation, but you work super hard to even make that happen. Business is always on your mind! And inevitably, you are going to experience rejection. Deals that seem like slam dunks, sometimes they fall through!

So, why do you do all this? Why would someone put themselves through this?

New home selling is actually a lifestyle. It’s a mindset. You actually enjoy helping people achieve the dream of finding their new home. You relish that moment when you hand the homebuyers their keys knowing they get to start their new life. And while money isn’t everything, you also get to reap the rewards of being in the top 3% of the income bracket in this country.

Bottomline, selling new homes is not easy, but nothing worthwhile ever is.

 

Next Steps

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach | Posted: April 25, 2017

In 1966 Robert F. Kennedy delivered a speech that included a Chinese proverb which says “May he live in interesting times.”

Like it or not, we live in interesting times. They are times of danger and uncertainty, but they are also the most creative of any time in the history of mankind.

Transitioning

In many ways, the quote above resonates with me as I begin the transition out of my Myers Barnes sales training & consulting and into my role as president of Builder Designs. For the past 20 plus years, I have had the privilege and honor of working with some of the best and brightest home builders in the US and Canada. During that time we’ve made significant progress not only in the sales training arena but in general business model progression and enhancement. I truly feel blessed to have been part of that.

Looking Forward

I start my new role as President of Builder Design in June, and as I wind down MBA I have been asked the question: “are you still going to be doing sales training and consulting?”. The answer is yes, but in a limited, private capacity. Starting in June my sales training and business consulting will be limited to just Builder Designs clients. Builder Designs will offer complimentary seminars, webinars, and consultations for just their clients, and they’ll all be centered around the web – digital marketing – sales and sales management training for a web savvy homebuyer.

More to Come

I’ll be bringing my passion and experience to the Builder Designs team and to Builder Designs clients, and together we’ll be offering an integrated solution that’s unlike anything in the industry.

There’s so much coming that I want to share, but you’ll have to stay tuned for all of the new things we’ll be bringing to the table.

#disruptor

 

Sales Profiling: A Lead Is A Person, Not A Thing

Categories: Customer Service, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Management, New Home Sales Training | Posted: April 18, 2017

Sales professionals often refer to “leads” like a form letter. They read the characteristics and make assumptions.

These same people talk about working their leads via social media or the CRM system.

I wonder, how does these people who are being treated as a “lead” feel about the sales person? Do they categorize him or her as just “someone trying to sell me”? Do they recognize those form emails?

These characterizations create barriers that impact the sales process. You see the other person as a caricature or stereotype, based on brief information gained through an online inquiry or Facebook post. I guess we could call it “sales profiling”.

We’re in a new age of personal selling that was ironically spawned from impersonal impact of the Internet. People shop on the Web. They do their research there. They even look for reviews and recommendations.

But when it comes down to making an important purchase, like buying a new home, the sales process requires a personal relationship. A buyer needs to trust that a sales professional is truly committed to finding the right home—in the right location and at the right price. That trust doesn’t come from an introductory email or a few Facebook messages swapped online. It can start there, but you need to cultivate those relationships.

A “lead” is an inquiry that stems from interest. You need to gauge the level of interest by getting to know the person. A lead could go nowhere, or it could bring you to not just one sale, but more referrals.

Emails, online inquiries, and social media stir up leads. It’s your job to take the one-dimensional thing and create a relationship. Pick up the phone and call. Ask questions. Answer questions. Offer suggestions. Successful selling is a partnership between you and your customer. It only starts with a lead. Where will you take it?

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Motivate Your Sales Team With Optimism

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, Personal Development | Posted: April 4, 2017

A sales career is difficult. You have to work through rejections that far outnumber your successes. At times, it can be tough to keep pushing.

That’s where effective sales leadership comes in.

I recently wrote an article about “learning optimism”. A good sales leader possesses the valuable quality of positive thinking, and passes it along to the team.

Retrain and refresh.

I’ve seen dejected sales professionals who have heard a few too many times about a competitor’s homes, and has maybe lost sales to the other builder. They start to question themselves and the product.

This is when the sales leader steps in. Take the associate away from the sales task for a bit. Engage in re-training. Talk about the new homes that the buyers seem drawn to. Discuss the objections to the homes you’re selling. Remind the sales person of the positive aspects of these homes. If a customer feels the price is too high, then the sales associate hasn’t sold them on the value.

Maybe you need to sell the sales person first!

Demonstrate the real-world value.

Connect your road-weary sales professional with two or more satisfied homebuyers. Suggest they visit the homes and let the owners gush over the features they love, and how easy the building process progressed. Ask them what mattered to them, what influenced their decision, and why this builder is so exceptional. It’s a good refresher for your sales team to rediscover the true value of the buying experience and the product they’re selling.

Share success stories.

Ask your team members to talk about how they turned adversity around. They should explain the challenge and how they faced it down. It can sometimes be disheartening to hear about others’ success when you’re down, so be sure to highlight the challenge and how the sales associate overcame it. They need to relate to the struggle, not simply envy the outcome.

Put the responsibility where it belongs.

Sit down with your sales associate and explore the individual obstacles. What is good about the job? What is difficult? What would you like to do better?

Set daily, weekly, and monthly goals—not necessarily in terms of sales, but in process improvement. For example, rewrite your script for the initial conversation today. Tomorrow, make a list of common objections and script your responses. Identify a weekly goal for follow-ups.

A leader motivates others to achieve their potential, but, ultimately, it’s up to the individual to put thoughts into action.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Extra! Extra! Big News from Olathe, Kansas

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Marketing, New Home Sales Training | Posted: March 23, 2017

Myers Barnes joins Builder Designs as President.

Homebuilder website development firm expands its digital marketing services.

Chip & Myers at Builder Designs

OLATHE, KS—Homebuilders across North America have a powerful, marketing resource, the result of the newly announced partnership with two recognized experts. Nationally renowned new home sales strategist Myers Barnes has joined Builder Designs, a website development company that exclusively serves the homebuilding industry. Barnes has been named the president of Builder Designs, teaming up with the company’s founder and CEO, Chip Johnson.

As a speaker, educator, and best-selling author, Barnes has guided countless builders toward greater profits. His books include Reach the Top In New Home and Neighborhood Sales, which quickly became the certified handbook for sales professionals, and New Home Sales Negotiation, which is considered an industry playbook for success. His company, Myers Barnes Associates, has offered innovative thinking, strategic direction, and a wealth of growth-focused resources to homebuilders for over two decades.

Barnes and Johnson have collaborated countless times, and they realized that a stronger partnership would provide homebuilders with the support they need to successfully navigate the challenges of Internet marketing.

“I’ve always admired the level of success that Myers has sparked in clients—many of whom we’ve shared,” explains Johnson, who has developed websites for more than 450 homebuilders across North America. “We’ve seen that our knowledge, skills, and passion complement one another. Combining forces was a logical next step to better serve our clients.”

Barnes adds, “We live in a digital world. It’s less about techniques for closing the sale, and more about the online involvement. Homebuyers are doing far more research than ever before. Their needs have changed, the path to purchase has transformed, and so conventional strategies just don’t work anymore.”

Builder Designs is preparing to launch a series of new products that will continue to revolutionize Internet marketing. Builder Cloud and Builder IQ, for example, will open new gateways for gathering and analyzing data that is critical to connecting with and influencing homebuyers.

Barnes refers to the expansion of Builder Designs’ offerings as a “think tank for homebuilders and an all-inclusive online resource center.”

“We can work with a variety of builders, start-up or a seasoned pro, and apply our broad portfolio of services to build or refine strategy, execute the activities, and analyze the results,” says Barnes. “We’re looking at a bigger horizon, where we can do more than help builders to generate leads. We will use digital approaches to actually transform those leads into sales long before they walk into a builder’s model home.

Johnson has invested in deepening Builder Designs’ technical expertise. He has explored new possibilities for lead generation and conversion using a broader range of tools, including FindABuilder.

“Our clients won’t have to wonder if their Internet marketing works because we’ll be able to present the analytics to back it up,” Johnson adds.

For more information about Builder Designs, visit BuilderDesigns.com

About Builder Designs

Builder Designs was founded in 2004 by Chip Johnson, to address the specific online marketing needs of America’s homebuilders. Based in Olathe, Kansas, Builder Designs has become the world’s largest builder-centric, web design company, currently serving more than 400 builders. The combination of web design, search engine optimization (SEO) services, content management, and digital marketing strategy have propelled Builder Designs to become a formidable resource for the industry.

Ice Cubes To Eskimos

Categories: New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Management, New Home Sales Management Training, New Home Sales Training, New Home Sales Training Video | Posted: March 15, 2017

Have you ever received a backdoor compliment? When I was once told I could “sell ice cubes to eskimos,” the context may have been genuine, but the meaning wasn’t accurate.
As a real estate professional, you’re helping people make one of the single most significant decisions of their lives.  You’re not only selling a product, you’re helping people select the environment that will shape their lives and the lives of their families.
In the eskimos ‘case, selling someone something they don’t actually need would mean you’re in it only for the sake of the deal and not the good of the customer. Learn how simply keeping the goal of service in the forefront of your sales will make all the difference.
Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

True Happiness Is Progress

Categories: Personal Development | Posted: February 28, 2017

An Chinese philosopher once said, “The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step.” So where do you begin on the journey to true happiness?

Some people equate happiness to having more stuff and acquiring more things. But in reality, genuine happiness is progress, or the joy that comes with forward movement. And although it may be easy to confuse change with progress, not all change will make us happy. Why? Because change is automatic where progress takes dedicated effort. If you seek true happiness, it can only be achieved when you’re working toward a specific goal. So start right now, and learn more about realizing your goal for happiness.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.