Myers Barnes Blog

Life Feel Like A Pressure Cooker?

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales Process, Personal Development | Posted: January 17, 2017

What’s a pressure cooker have to do with selling? There’s always pressure to be successful; financial pressure, family pressure, pressure from ourselves.  As we reach a new level, expect a new devil. In other words, when you climb out of your comfort zone, you will be subjected to greater challenges. The reason everyone isn’t meeting their potential for success is because not everyone is up for the challenge. If it were easy, everyone would do it! The key is to embrace the pressure, and not let it outweigh the positive aspects of the process. Just like a pressure cooker, you must keep the positive internal pressure greater than the negative (external) pressure. If you do, you’ll win in this game called life.  

Bottom line: When the pressure on the inside is greater than the pressure on the outside, you’re winning.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Pessimism vs. Optimism

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Training Video, Personal Development | Posted: January 3, 2017

Myers Barnes illustrates pessimism versus optimism with a glass half full, half empty analogy. With the half full mindset, you see all things as possible and there’s no failure; with the half empty mindset, you find opposition and have a “I’m not being negative, I’m just being realistic.” outlook.  If you believe in negative outcomes, they become true and even worse, a self-fulfilling prophecy.  In this video, America’s favorite new home sales trainer explains that the glass can’t be both half full and half empty, it has to be one or the other.  The truth is the glass is always half FULL, it’s just a matter of what it’s full with – air or matter – aka: mind over matter.  Making positive change in life starts with a positive outlook, and all you have to do is believe you can achieve.

Bottom line: Optimism makes you rich, pessimism makes you poor, not just in your wallet, but in your life!

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Business – A War Without Bullets

Categories: Customer Service, Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Process, New Home Sales Training, Personal Development | Posted: December 27, 2016

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In 1964, two men shook hands and formed Blue Ribbon Sports, a running shoe company, inspired by a Japanese company.

Five years later, on the suggestion of a friend, that company became Nike. And it revolutionized the world of sports and athletic clothing.

One of those two men was Phil Knight, who ran track at the University of Oregon, under legendary coach, Bill Bowerman, the other man in the business agreement

Nike’s pioneering approach to shoe design launched a flood of competition, as companies like Adidas, New Balance, and Puma sought to steal their share of the burgeoning market that Nike created.

Phil Knight once said, “Business is like a war without bullets.”

In business, we battle for territory—whether that’s mastery over a geographic region or a particular vertical market. We study the competition’s strategy, learning their winning ways and identifying their weaknesses. We take aim at conquering their territory. Coca-Cola and Pepsi have been at it for years, introducing new ad campaigns and new brands to take consumers away from the enemy. Both have had victories and epic failures. Yet, their battle wages on.

How are you fighting the war with and on your business? Are you strategizing ways to better define your value proposition? Are you identifying aspects about your homes, properties, construction, and service that differentiate you? Have you tried different approaches to overcome potential threats from your competitors?

You will not succeed in a stagnant position. The enemy will know where you are, who you are, and exactly what and how you sell. You’re an easy target.

The dynamic business with visionary leadership thrives. They are finding ways to invade territory that has been “owned” by other companies. They’re adding new designs to their arsenal. They’re looking at under-served markets that present sales potential. And they’re examining the way they manage their own troops—their sales force—to ensure that these front-line soldiers are armed with the knowledge, product, sales training, and ammunition to be successful.

The housing industry is rebounding from the housing bubble that burst about eight years ago. The survivors of that horrific devastation adjusted to the drastic downturn that crippled many developers. They fought through the tough times, having learned how to be agile and adapt.

Yes, the housing market is improving, but you still must be prepared to be tough and vigilant. Every sale you lose is a battle lost.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Selling Is A Contact Sport

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Process, Personal Development, Uncategorized | Posted: December 13, 2016

contact-sport-236x300We have evolved into a culture that expects instant gratification. We want Wi-Fi everywhere so we can access anything we want, at any time—and we don’t want a slow connection. How many times have you groaned while waiting for a file to download?

We have DVRs and On Demand television viewing so we can catch the shows and movies we want with the push of a button. And we want express shipping without the express price.

Email used to be a great way to quickly communicate with people…until text messaging came along. Then, email became the equivalent of snail mail, because we want an instant reply. Who wants to wait for an email response?

Let me tell you, though, you have to tame that addiction to super-speed when you’re in sales. As much as the general public wants fast response, they don’t necessarily give one in return. You’re competing with all of the other distractions in their lives. Your customers will reply when it suits them. It’s not their responsibility to respond. It’s your job to make the connection.

Far too often, I see new home sales professionals give in and give up after just a few attempts to follow up with their prospective homebuyers.

Really? These buyers are preparing to make the largest investment of their lives and they should hand it over to someone who isn’t committed enough to them to follow through?

The strength of your efforts contribute proportionally to your results. A phone message and an email is not enough to spark a relationship with a busy buyer. That’s s first date, not a relationship. A form letter without personalization is lazy, and won’t get you anywhere either.

A friend of mine is currently in the market for a new home. She visited one community, spoke with a sales associate, and learned about another community by the same builder, one that was more family-friendly in terms of amenities. This homebuyer didn’t visit that second community, but was contacted three times by another agent from that community. This person she never met thanked her for her visit and interest, and even asked her to complete a survey about the community.

She told me she even replied to the agent to advise him of the error and received yet another form letter in response.

Build a process for building connections.

The undeniable truth is that most home or homesite sales occur as a result of multiple, quality contacts. Persistence and consistency are the keys to strengthening the relationship that is essential in making the sale. The moment you stop calling or writing, you give up the sale, and another sales professional picks it up.

When you forget them, they forget you. It’s that simple.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Move Now Before Interest Rates Do (Referred To As The “Interest Rate Close”)

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Management, Personal Development, Real Estate Courses | Posted: December 6, 2016

1Most consumers and sales professionals alike may not understand the urgency of moving now before the interest rates do. However, use the example of rates increasing by merely one percentage point. I’ll illustrate why this is important.

Suppose a home is priced at $295,000. Naturally, the customers we consult with and salespeople we educate represent homes across America that may have prices as little as $199,000 or up in the millions of dollars. But, we’ll take the median of $295,000, purely for example purposes. Now, keep in mind the difference between cost and price. The price of $295,000 is a one-time event, while the interest rate represents a 30 year on-going cost.

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Please note the difference in payment (cost). A mere one-percent increase in interest rates seems small at only $171 per month. However, an increase in the monthly payment (cost) over 30 years is a whopping $61,560!

Using this example, you may want to memorize and internalize the following script (Sales Dialogue) and use it to convey the urgency to your potential customers “to move now before the rates do.”

Prospect: We need to think it over (or) sell our home (or) wait (stall) for whatever reason.

Superachiever: Miss Prospect, may I explain the benefit of moving now, rather than waiting?

Prospect: Yes.

Superachiever: The challenge with waiting involves several factors. First, if you are not aware, interest rates have been considerably rising. As a matter of fact, rising rates are an inevitability. With this in mind, consider how interest rates can affect the value of a brand new home.

When acquiring a home, you must always consider the relationship between cost and price. The price of the home is only $295,000 and is, of course, a one-time consideration and a fixed amount. However, cost is an on-going expense and can dramatically affect the final value of a home. A mere one-percent increase in interest rates represents an additional $171 per month or $61,560 over the entire term of a 30-year loan. When you analyze the situation, it’s as if you can say the price of a $295,000 home will now cost $356,560 if interest rates rise by merely another percentage point. Miss Prospect, my question to you is, “Do you think it’s possible that rates could continue to go up?”

Prospect: I suppose they could.

Superachiever: Then I suggest you consider moving now before the rates do. Does that make sense to you?

Prospect: Yes, when you put it that way, I suppose it makes perfect sense.

Superachiever: Let’s do this. We’ll work together and select the perfect home and place it on the ideal homesite, and simultaneously discuss the best financial program available to fit your unique needs.

With this information and selling strategy, you should be able to take advantage of any move the market and the economy make. Of course, the best information won’t benefit you unless you apply it. So take this information and if it applies to your selling situation, change your selling strategy before the interest rates do.

*Calculations do not include taxes and insurance

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Easy Street Is A Detour Off The Road To Success

Categories: New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Management, New Home Sales Management Training, Personal Development | Posted: November 29, 2016

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Scott Peck’s classic book, “The Road Less Traveled”, starts with three words:

“Life is difficult.”

Peck first published the bestseller in 1978—before the Internet, smartphones, and all the gadgetry that has been created, presumably, to make our lives less difficult. Has it? Or has technology given us the idea that we can get whatever we want, as fast as we want?

The road to achievement is less traveled, because it is marked with bumps and potholes—obstacles that can sometimes be difficult to navigate. Life not an easy trip. It’s not promised to be. Without challenge, we don’t grow. We don’t learn how to improvise and innovate. We merely move along, accepting the status quo.

Those who want a smooth ride can aim for the easy way out, but what will they miss along the way?

When I hit a bump in the road, I take it as a learning experience. Why did I end up here? Did I take a wrong turn or make a bad decision? Was I basing my choice on incorrect or incomplete information, while ignoring my instincts? What can I take away from this part of my journey?

As much as we would love to take the express route to success, there are no shortcuts. In fact, taking Easy Street is a detour off the road to success.

In his 2008 book, “Outliers: The Story of Success”, Malcom Gladwell presented his “10,000-Hour Rule”. He posited that achieving true mastery—not mere proficiency—of any skill requires 10,000 hours of practice. Becoming an expert doesn’t happen by reading a couple of books or attending a webinar. You have to put that knowledge to work, test it, refine it, and shape it into your own success. That type of achievement doesn’t occur quickly. It can’t.

When you choose speed over commitment, you compromise the outcome. You might even settle for “good enough”, which equates to “average”. Does average make you remarkable? Does average define successful people?

Imagine where we would be if everyone took the easy way out. Mediocrity might replace the exceptional. We would settle for what we have. People might attempt to strive for something more, but they would give up short of reaching the goal.

Easy Street is a dead-end road for anyone who desires true success. Don’t delay your journey with shortcuts.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

The Power Of The Positive “No”

Categories: Customer Service, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Management Training, New Home Sales Training, Personal Development | Posted: November 15, 2016

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Former British prime minister Tony Blair once said, “The art of leadership is not saying ‘Yes’. It is saying ‘No’.”

Saying “no” to a request, an offer, or invitation doesn’t have to negative. We just need to learn how to say “No” in the right way.

Warren Buffett told William Ury, author of “Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In”, “I don’t understand all this Yes stuff. In my line of business, the most important word is ‘No’. I sit there all day and look at investment proposals and say, ‘No’, ‘No’, ‘No’—until I see exactly what I’m looking for. And then I say, ‘Yes.’”’

Even Ury himself said, “the main obstacle to getting to Yes is learning how to say ‘No’ properly.”

Why is it so difficult?

I think it’s because we perceive the word “No” as negative, limiting, and off-putting. So, we say “Yes” when we shouldn’t. We agree to terms that aren’t reasonable. We commit our time to things that aren’t worthwhile.

Then what happens? We grudgingly go through with what we agreed to do. We kick ourselves, and moan about “what I should have said.” So, let’s put an end to that pain.

Aim for a positive “No”. Rather than a blunt refusal, offer another possibility.

“I can certainly appreciate your needs here, and maybe we can find a different way to meet them that is more mutually agreeable.”

You’ve nicely said rejected the offer without ending the conversation.

“I’d like to do that for you, but right now, I can’t. Is there any flexibility in your timeline?”

You let the person know that you’re busy but still willing to help, if and when possible.

“I wish I could help, but I’m tied up; however, I might know someone who can.”

You provide an alternative, by saying “Yes” to helping, but on a different level—offering another resource.

The words “Yes” and “No” don’t have to be mutually exclusive. The successful way to deliver a positive “No” is by finding a way to blend the negative response with a positive one. “No, but…” or “Yes, but…” provide a sturdy bridge.

Someone once told me, “Every time you say ‘yes’ to someone else, you say ‘no’ to yourself.” Remind yourself of that. Respect the value of your time and hone the skill of delivering a positive “No”.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Rethinking the Sales Process

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Management, New Home Sales Marketing, New Home Sales Process, New Home Sales Training | Posted: November 1, 2016

transferring-innovation-from-science-to-businessThe new home sales process is a science and, as with any scientific field, gut feelings and hunches do not play a role. A good business plan should be developed with a solid strategy and an understanding that selling and marketing new homes consists of four components.

Labeled the Four Ps, they were popularized by Proctor & Gamble and are utilized by industry giants such as General Electric and Microsoft. The Four P’s are effective because they break the sales and marketing process into four parts: Place, Product, Price & Promotion.

PLACE. You’ve heard the old adage: The three keys to buying real estate are location, location, location. It’s absolutely true.

The successful builder/developer understands that people don’t just live in homes. They live in a particular area, within the confines of a neighborhood in which the homes are located. Location is the factor that separates one neighborhood from another. Any builder/developer can, for the most part, construct homes at approximately the same cost per square foot, provided comparable materials are used. But the one single factor that changes the perception of value is where one home is located over another.

PRODUCT. Who is your competition? It is either other builders, or, in the case of an established neighborhood, your competition may be the resale market. You should only enter a market when your product has a perceived value that surpasses your competition.

When evaluating housing designs and floor plans, study the area’s past 12- to 24-month sales history. If a distinct market-share has been established with three-bedroom, 2.5 bath homes, then do not attempt to reinvent the wheel. Enter the marketplace with a proven design and simply add enhancements such as vaulted ceilings, spa baths, walk-in closets, or a better use of square footage. Then, you are sure to gain your fair percentage of market share.

PRICE. Again, gut feelings and hunches play no role in determining the price point for your homes. Price cannot ultimately be determined by your desire for a certain profit margin, but rather by what consumers have paid in the past.

Price is easily determined by comparable values, which can be accessed through MLS. To disregard historical pricing data and produce a product at prices that are not proven in the marketplace is writing your own invitation to disaster.

PROMOTION. Contrary to popular belief, promotion is not limited to just a good “sales process.” To reach a target audience, you must effectively plan and budget. My personal belief is that your marketing, merchandising, and products should be so good that they could almost make you, as a salesperson, obsolete.

Today’s great salespeople have developed a new mindset: They recognize that success no longer depends on communicating the value of the offering, but instead rests on the salesperson’s ability to “create value” for customers. Builders and developers who delude themselves into believing that selling is easy and strictly a function of building houses will be beat like a drum in the marketplace. It is important to grasp this truth: A sales process is a series of actions and systems directed toward the end result, which is creating a sale on purpose.

In most cases, failure in the marketplace is the result of poor planning. The Four P’s – Place, Product, Price and Promotion – are like a four-legged stool. If each is not weighted proportionately and backed with a proven sales process, the stool will wobble and become unbalanced. If the four areas are not balanced, you may see your sales topple just like a lopsided stool.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Healthy Competition. How Will You Stand Out From The Crowd?

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Management, New Home Sales Management Training, Personal Development, Real Estate Courses | Posted: October 18, 2016

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As any U.S. builder knows, housing is a competitive business. But imagine for a moment if it wasn’t.

Think about Google. Google is a monopoly because it has no real competition. No other search engines—not even those from Microsoft or Yahoo—can come close to its level of popularity. PayPal cofounder Peter Thiel told Business Insider magazine that Google is a monopoly because it’s “a kind of company that’s so good at what it does that no other firm can offer a close substitute,” a company that’s “10x” better at what it does than anybody else.

Google has no competition and thus does not compete with any other companies and needs no advertising or salespeople for its distribution. Sounds nice, right?

Now, back to reality. In an uber-competitive marketplace like home building, other builders are constantly breathing down your neck. Of course, ideas like sales processes, advertising, and model homes are important but in our industry price is king. A competitive building company must sell its homes at a market price and–like it or not– you don’t get to decide the price.

Price should be determined by comparable values, which can be accessed through MLS. The market dictates the price, and to disregard the market with prices that are higher than what the market will bear, you will swim upstream into futility.

One more thing: Because housing is so competitive, successful companies must differentiate themselves from the crowd in order to make the sale. And it takes more than just building a “quality” house to differentiate.

As you already know, the home building industry is not like Google. It is market driven, so pick your market carefully and have a solid strategy in place to stand out from the competition. In my next blog I’ll address the four pillars of successful sales and marketing.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Nix the naysayers. Their toxicity can be terminal!

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Management, Personal Development | Posted: October 4, 2016

Four blank white speech bubblesYou know some of those people. No matter what you say, they reply with a negative comment.

You say it looks like a nice day. They tell you to expect foul weather.

You talk about the opportunities that lay ahead. They focus on the obstacles. They’ll tell you “it can’t be done.”

Theodore Roosevelt said, “Believe you can and you’re halfway there.”

People who always steer toward the negative side are destined to remain unfulfilled. Maybe they tell you that this pessimism is based on experience, but I believe they are the drivers of their success or failure. Those people who thrive are the ones who nix the naysayers. They have more faith in what’s possible than what others tell them is beyond that realm.

Every invention we enjoy today resulted from someone trying harder and believing in possibility. Thomas Edison tried 10,000 ways to invent electricity. Some might say he failed. He viewed it as the path to his success. “I have not failed,” he said. “I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”

If you want to succeed in life and work, focus on what you can do, what you positivitycan change, and what you want to achieve. It doesn’t matter what others tell you. Determination and positivity will take you much farther than even your skill. Michael Jordan was cut from his high school basketball team because his coach thought he wasn’t good enough. He didn’t let that negative belief stop him. He worked harder, practiced relentlessly. And he became one of the best professional basketball players of all time.

Walt Disney was fired from his first job as a newspaper cartoonist. His editor thought he had no creative ideas.

Avoid negative thinkers. They’re toxic to your success. Don’t let their poison seep into your belief in yourself.

We are the sum of our choices and the reflection of our beliefs. Choose well. Believe in yourself. Success will be your reward.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant. For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.