Myers Barnes Blog

Six cool, calm approaches to selling your home during the winter

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Marketing | Posted: February 10, 2016

Don’t let challenging winter months affect the sale of your current home! Here are a few tips for selling your house in the winter.

Tips For Selling Your Home In The Winter

  • Think minimal yet warm. Keep holiday decorations minimal and tasteful. And make sure to take them down in a timely manner. Feel free to spread some warmth, though. Nothing is more welcoming than some hot apple cider or tea for potential buyers to savor as they explore your home. Plus, it’s never a bad thing for your chilled buyers to take a minute or two to warm up in the kitchen before heading back into the cold.
  • Keep it cozy. Tailor your listing description for wintertime. Play up the amenities that are desirable during the winter: an attached garage, a new water heater or HVAC components, a fireplace or skylights. You might also mention that your home is close to a gym or fitness center so that buyers know they can work out during winter months, when they’re less likely to be able to exercise outside.
  • Put a positive spin on winter. Not everyone hates winter, so play up your proximity to ski slopes, skating rinks, etc. You can also include that your home is within walking distance to the grocery store or pharmacy, or minutes from the bus or commuter rail line – all selling points if the weather is bad.
  • Price it right. Wintertime usually means fewer homes are on the market, so take advantage of it! A properly priced home can lead to a bidding war between buyers, which can ultimately increase the price you get for your home and decrease the time it’s on the market. On the other hand, an overpriced home can sit for months on the market, which is not something you want when spring rolls around and your competition spikes.
  • A home for all seasons. One of the challenges of selling a home in the winter is that curb appeal is, well, curbed. The flowerbeds are empty, the trees and shrubs are asleep. Since you don’t necessarily want to wait until springtime to show your home, you need to help buyers visualize what your home looks like during all seasons. Take photos of the cherry tree in the front yard that’s absolutely beautiful during the spring, or the oak out back that turns magnificent colors in October, or the hydrangea that’s glorious in June. Include these photos with your home’s online listing and highlight each season’s best features.
  • Winterize your open house. If you are having a winter open house, make sure your driveway, walkways, and porches are clear of snow and ice, and that the heat is on. Your potential buyers have slogged through the inclement weather, so set out a doormat mat so they feel welcomed and can wipe their feet before entering. The attention to detail will show that you care about your house, which potential buyers will appreciate.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

 

 

 

 

Connecting The Dots!

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Marketing, New Home Sales Process, New Home Sales Training, Uncategorized | Posted: January 12, 2016

Let’s zero in on the one connective thread that binds together the perfect pre-sale

launch campaign – the timing of the launch and the specific day to begin pre-selling.

The timeline is essential to a successful launch. I’m giving you a summary of the homebuilder’s timeline here. Keep it handy.

90 To 150 Days Prior To A Pre-Sale Event

Install marketing signs and place community on website. Use “Coming Soon” verbiage, but no pricing!

60 Days Prior To A Pre-Sale Event

Direct mail to region ZIP codes

45 Days Prior To A Pre-Sale Event

  • Direct mail to region ZIP codes
  • Generate and distribute a press release to local media, civic groups (e.g., Chamber of Commerce), community calendars, and digital media.
  • Place mid-size ads in local real estate publications.Screen Shot 2015-12-18 at 2.23.56 PM

30 Days Prior To A Pre-Sale Event

Make sure all numbers have been crunched and base pricing for homes and homesites is finalized for internal release only.

25 Days Prior To A Pre-Sale Event

  • Design and send invitations to your database.
  • Consider using a fold-over invitation, and/or oversized postcards.
  • Push VIP invitations through digital media channels, email and Facebook.

15 Days Prior To A Pre-Sale Event

  • Make personal phone calls to your database.
  • Send emails to database: “You’re Invited to a VIP Launch/Pre-sale Event.”

To learn more about setting up a Pre-Sale Launch, download the FREE Proven Pre-Sales E-book!

Are you attending the International Builder’s Show? Let Myers Barnes & Mollie Elkman walk you through the proven formula that will help your sales team successfully execute the pre-sales process in their speaker event, “Proven Pre-Sales: How To Sell A Community Before The Walls Are Up!”

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Handling Leads & Prospects

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Marketing, New Home Sales Process, New Home Sales Training | Posted: January 5, 2016

In the months leading up to your launch, your sales team will generate leads and prospects. If you establish a lead-nurturing system for managing those potential homebuyers, you’ll proactively plan for greater success.

Your system should be easy to understand and follow and be monitored by management. If it’s too complicated, your sales team may stray from this essential program. You don’t need anyone going rogue with your leads and prospects!

52 Weeks Prior To LAUNCH

It can be hard to create and maintain momentum so far in advance, but before any

groundbreaking occurs on the property, your sales associates need to break ground on their lead generation and management. Remind them that this is a lengthy process, with an organized plan to follow. Start strong. Finish stronger!

  • Build A Prospect Database
  • Start A Referral Network
  • Start Working Your Leads

12 Weeks Prior To LAUNCH

Screen Shot 2015-12-18 at 2.17.23 PM

The event is in sight. Stay focused and pay attention to those details that will spark greater interest in the weeks leading up to your launch.

  • Focus Your Social Media On The Launch
  • Blog
  • Update Your Website To A Responsive Web Design

To learn more about setting up a Pre-Sale Launch, download the FREE Proven Pre-Sales E-book!

Are you attending the International Builder’s Show? Let Myers Barnes & Mollie Elkman walk you through the proven formula that will help your sales team successfully execute the pre-sales process in their speaker event, “Proven Pre-Sales: How To Sell A Community Before The Walls Are Up!”

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Planning Isn’t Everything… It’s the ONLY thing!

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Marketing, New Home Sales Process, New Home Sales Training | Posted: December 29, 2015

The purpose of the launch is to generate pre-sales, a process normally carried out before a home, and in some cases a neighborhood, is actually built. It requires lots of planning.

When will you be ready to launch? Follow this calendar for your time-sensitive tasks building up to the launch.

52 Weeks Prior To LAUNCH

  • Groom Your Property
  • Develop A Budget
  • Meet With Non-Building Related Partners
  • Hire A Photographer And Videographer

From 52 weeks to 12 weeks prior to the launch, you are planning, working, fine-tuning your strategy, and prepping to sell. Never allow a lapse in your process.

12 Weeks Prior To LAUNCH

  • Look At Physical Obstacles
  • Finalize The Plans, Plats, And Appropriate Governmental Approvals

4 Weeks Prior To LAUNCH

Screen Shot 2015-12-18 at 2.12.23 PM

  • Install Signage
  • Furnish, Photograph, And Videotape The Models
  • Add The Finishing Exterior Touches

Bottom Line: The visual component is critical to drawing attention to your community, so follow a planned schedule to ensure your presentation stays on track.

To learn more about setting up a Pre-Sale Launch, download the FREE Proven Pre-Sales E-book!

Are you attending the International Builder’s Show? Let Myers Barnes & Mollie Elkman walk you through the proven formula that will help your sales team successfully execute the pre-sales process in their speaker event, “Proven Pre-Sales: How To Sell A Community Before The Walls Are Up!”

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

 

Should You Launch Into A Pre-Sale?

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Marketing, New Home Sales Process, New Home Sales Training | Posted: December 22, 2015

To launch or not to launch – that should be the question.

Every community can have a launch, but not every community should have one.

The launch can revive a struggling effort or kick-start a new community. But, it may not be appropriate for your particular situation. The market dynamics must be aligned so that buyers are actually buying. The midst of a recession or a real estate crash is not the time to attempt to launch a community. You can dangle your bait in a pond, but if the fish aren’t biting (or even swimming in that pond), you’ll come up empty-handed.

Bottom Line: Before investing the time and money to create a successful pre-sale event, consider whether your community will benefit from it and, if so, the right time to launch it.

Screen Shot 2015-12-18 at 1.22.47 PM

To learn more about setting up a Pre-Sale Launch, download the FREE Proven Pre-Sales E-book!

Are you attending the International Builder’s Show? Let Myers Barnes & Mollie Elkman walk you through the proven formula that will help your sales team successfully execute the pre-sales process in their speaker event, “Proven Pre-Sales: How To Sell A Community Before The Walls Are Up!”

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

 

Should You Buy A New Home or A Used Home?

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Management, New Home Sales Marketing, New Home Sales Process | Posted: December 15, 2015

Show your customers the advantages of buying a new home compared to an existing one.

In the cutthroat world of new-home sales every builder faces competition, whether from large national players or the guy down the street with a pickup truck and toolbox. Knowing who your competitors are is key to success because it helps you to learn how to differentiate yourself from them.

But in many markets, a new-home builder’s biggest adversary isn’t another builder, it’s another type of home: an existing one. The reality is that there are a number of reasons why a home buyer might prefer a resale house, even one that needs extensive work. So, in the spirit of “getting to know the competition,” let’s look at some of the reasons why.

For instance, the buyer of a resale home may have his or her heart set on moving to a specific urban neighborhood or older suburb where newly constructed houses are rare or non-existent. Or, a resale buyer might be a do-it-yourself aficionado who relishes the opportunity to transform an old house into a dream home, even if it takes considerable time and money.

In these cases, it’s understandable that some homebuyers prefer an existing house. But what about other clients who are on the fence about whether a new home is right for them? As you well know, there are considerable advantages to buying a brand new home, so make sure you point them out. Here are a few:

Community amenities: Many new homes are located in master-planned developments with resort-style community centers, large pools, trails, and clubhouses. Plus, new homes are almost always situated in close proximity to some some of the best schools and shopping so play up all the amenities in and around your communities.

Customization: A second advantage of a new home is that the buyer can have input on its design and product selections. Most discriminating home buyers don’t want to settle for someone else’s choices when they can select their own cabinets, countertops, appliances, carpets and flooring. Remind them that ultimately a brand new home will reflect their personal style, not someone else’s taste.

Energy savings: Today’s new homes are far more energy efficient than homes built 10 or 20 years ago, something your customers may not think about. Show them how much they can expect to save on heating and cooling bills by buying one of your state-of-the-art homes. It’s also important to talk about how today’s homes are healthier, with low-emitting products and paints and the latest ventilation and air filtration equipment that provide unparalleled indoor air quality

Low maintenance: As mentioned earlier, there are indeed some do-it-yourselfers who love to spend their free time repairing and fixing their homes, but they are in the minority. Most homeowners prefer to relax and do fun things with their friends or family during their free time. New homes are the obvious choice for this group because they are built with modern systems and components that require less care and maintenance and are engineered to work together for hassle-free living

Less upkeep: A resale home likely has tired products that may soon need replacing. Remind your customers that with an existing home there is always a looming concern of what it’s going cost to replace a roof, appliances, or a water heater. Those are the unadvertised costs of not buying new, because everything in a resale home is used and out of warranty. Instead, show them how your warranties will protect their home for the long haul—20- or 30-year warranties for roofing materials, 10-year warranties for structural components, and five to seven years for HVAC systems.

Financing: Without question, financing is one of the most confusing aspects of the home-buying process. To help customers through this difficult time, partner with mortgage subsidiaries or affiliates to custom-tailor financing and down payment options to each buyer’s specific lending situation. And, with new homes there is no home inspection, so the closing is fast and efficient.

Resale value: Your buyer may plan to live in his or her next home for many years, but at some point most people sell a home for a multitude of reasons — perhaps they are moving up to a bigger home to accommodate a growing family…. or moving down to smaller digs when children are gone…or moving across town or even across the country for another job. And when the time comes to move, a five- or seven-year old home will often be more desirable — given all the features above — than a 25-year old home at resale.

When you lay out all the reasons why your new homes are superior to existing ones, you realize how this information can benefit your sales process. For example, Charlotte, N.C.-based production builder Evans Coghill uses these types of arguments to woo buyers using the mantra “Why buy new?”—a question the company explores in an eight-part blog on its website. The article, which has been popular with buyers and Realtors, details how a newly built home can be priced in line with a previously owned one while offering greater energy efficiency and lower maintenance.

“In infill neighborhoods especially, this has helped us a great deal,” marketing director Alan Banks told BUILDER magazine. “It helps us position ourselves as the ‘New vs. Old Experts.’”

 Bottom line: In almost every aspect of the home buying process, new homes have an advantage. Consider what your prospects are looking for and help them to see how your new home beats a resale every time.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can’t win if you can’t lose.

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Process, New Home Sales Training, Personal Development | Posted: December 1, 2015

Winning

If there is no chance of losing, is there any victory to be had? A “sure thing” is not a win. Conversely, if you have no chance of winning—like most carnival games—you can’t truly lose.

We can see more clearly with stark contrast. Black and white. Good and evil. Winning and losing.

If I handed you a football on the five-yard line and all the players stood halfway down the field, would you feel the sense of victory after you simply walked over the goal line? Would it feel like a touchdown?

No. When you have outmaneuvered a 320-pound lineman whose only job is to take you down as soon as you hold the football, that’s when you feel victory. That’s an achievement.

“The thrill of victory, the agony of defeat” was the long-standing slogan for ABC’s “Wide World of Sports”. In every competition, both of these emotions emerge. Opposing sides, opposing emotions.

Winning and losing involve drama, because there is risk. You have to make decisions with no guarantee of the outcome. If every new home sale were a “gimme”, you would lose interest. Sales people, by nature, thrive on competition. They want to “win”—even if they are only competing against their own standards.

I applaud those people who lose on occasion, because they have experienced the feeling of not winning. That doesn’t make them losers—unless they crumble under the weight of a failure, or even a string of failures. Those who learn from loss and come back to be stronger, smarter, and better will relish the win because they’ve been on the other side.

You can’t win if there is no chance of losing. A loss is an event, not a person. Don’t personalize it. Meaning is what you attach to a person, place, or thing. How will you view it?

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

Failure is the mother of success

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Process, New Home Sales Training, Personal Development | Posted: November 17, 2015

An ancient Chinese proverb says, “Failure is the mother of success.” When I was starting out in business, I reminded myself of these words, over and over again.

Looking back, while I understood the meaning of the proverb, I don’t think I fully embraced the importance of the concept until years later. I had to experience failure a few times, to feel the disappointment and frustration, before I could appreciate the purpose of failure.

Thomas Edison tried 10,000 times to find a way to invent the light bulb. He explained, “I have not failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.”Failure breeds success.

Baseball great Babe Ruth scored 714 home runs during his career, but he also held the record for most strikeouts: 1,330. Did that faze him? “Every strike brings me closer to the next home run.”

“Colonel” Harland David Sanders believed in his recipe for fried chicken, but was rejected 1,009 times before a restaurant accepted it.

Theodor “Dr. Seuss” Geisel’s first manuscript was rejected by 27 publishers. The award-winning children’s book author later said, “Whenever things go a bit sour in a job I’m doing, I always tell myself, ‘You can do better than this’.”

The Beatles were evaluated by a record company that reported, “we don’t like their sound, and guitar music is on the way out.” Walt Disney was fired from a job as a newspaper cartoonist because the editor said he “lacked imagination and had no good ideas.” The assessment of Fred Astaire’s first screen test stated, “Can’t act. Can’t sing. Slightly bald. Can dance a little.”

Slowly, in the School of Life, I’ve learned that obstacles rise up before you, setbacks occur when you least expect them, and failure is a given. I’ve also learned that I will not die from failures. Losing does not make me a loser, unless I believe myself to be one.

Failure is feedback. Take it. Learn from it. Move on. Success tastes much sweeter, but failure is food for thought.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

FREE Proven Pre-Sales E-book Launched Today!

Categories: New Home Sales, New Home Sales Marketing, New Home Sales Process | Posted: November 9, 2015

Proven Pre-Sales E-Book

Renowned author and speaker, Myers Barnes, and international speaker and building industry expert, Mollie Elkman, have just released their new e-book, entitled PROVEN PRE-SALES: How to Successfully Launch a New Community. It guides homebuilders through the process of successfully – and profitably – launching a new home community. The book details the entire pre-sale process, offering up proven strategies, new perspectives and easy tips for generating sales.

Barnes and Elkman have combined their collective experience into this step-by-step guide to success. PROVEN PRE-SALES: How to Successfully Launch a New Community covers everything a builder needs to consider when planning and executing a new community launch, from choosing a date to developing a budget, to creating a marketing plan. Other topics include generating excitement that produces qualified prospects, overcoming known objections, and closing sales efficiently. The easy-to read book also features real-world examples of marketing materials that have been used for launches, as well as detailed calendars and schedules, media plans, and budgets.

“One main challenge facing the market right now is the availability of lots. To thrive in 2016 and beyond, homebuilders need a viable strategy to turn sales before they turn the first shovel of dirt,” Barnes said. “The secrets of pre-selling are finally revealed in this paint-by-numbers e-book!”

As recognized thought leaders in the Homebuilding Industry, Myers Barnes and Mollie Elkman have been chosen by the NAHB to speak on this topic at the 2016 International Builders Show in January.

For a builder looking for a practical and insightful guide to getting prospects to pre-order and pay upfront for a house that doesn’t yet exist, PROVEN PRE-SALES: How to Successfully Launch a New Community is the book to start them out on the right foot.

Click here to download a free copy of PROVEN PRE-SALES: How to Successfully Launch a New Community.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.

 

In pursuit of extra-ordinary

Categories: Leadership, New Home Sales, New Home Sales Coach, New Home Sales Management, New Home Sales Process, New Home Sales Training, Personal Development | Posted: November 3, 2015

“Extraordinary” is the result of coupling two words: “extra” and “ordinary”. Ordinary is average, but when you elevate it with the prefix “extra”, you experience something far beyond average.

A “C” grade is an average one. A student can get by with C’s. He can graduate, earn a degree, and go on to a career. But those marks indicate an ordinary person who doesn’t push to excel.

Ordinary people are satisfied with the status quo. Extraordinary people are driven to achieve greater results.

Ordinary people see what exists. Extraordinary people have the vision to see what is possible.

Ordinary people are predictable. Extraordinary people will surprise you.

Ordinary sales associates will close deals and live up to expectations. Extraordinary sales associates exceed them.

Extraordinary

As a new home sales manager, you might be expecting extraordinary results from ordinary sales associates. You might be recruiting people to fill the roles without clearly understanding what extraordinary results mean to your business. If you don’t make the necessary effort to find and attract extraordinary sales talent—but invest in people who are merely gaining experience for their next job—then you deserve what you get.

It takes vision to look beyond the ordinary, to envision new ideas that will broaden your business. You also need to see your flaws, and not as weaknesses but opportunities to become better.

It takes time to build your team and your company, populating it with extraordinary people and nurturing them with opportunity. Ongoing sales training, attractive incentives, and ongoing acknowledgement will help you retain your most valuable assets!

And it takes guts to take risks. You will not always win, and you embrace that reality. In fact, competition makes your victories that much sweeter.

But look at the reward. Your effort in sculpting the company to “extra-ordinary” will deliver grade “A” success. Keep your eye on that goal.

Myers Barnes is America’s favorite new home sales trainer, author, speaker and consultant.  For more information, please visit www.myersbarnes.com.